Detail Page

Item Picture
published by the Physics Education Technology Project
This item is an interactive simulation relating to forces required to move objects along a 1-D path.  Users control the amount of force as they "push" objects of varying mass, from a book to a refrigerator.  Friction and gravitational constants may also be changed.  A free-body diagram is included, plus simultaneous graphs of velocity vs. time and position vs. time.  

This item is part of a larger collection of simulations developed by the Physics Education Technology project (PhET).
Subjects Levels Resource Types
Classical Mechanics
- Applications of Newton's Laws
- Work and Energy
- High School
- Lower Undergraduate
- Instructional Material
= Activity
= Interactive Simulation
Intended Users Formats Ratings
- Learners
- Educators
- application/java
  • Currently 0.0/5

Want to rate this material?
Login here!


Mirror:
http://phet.colorado.edu/sims/for…
Access Rights:
Free access
Restriction:
© 2005 University of Colorado at Boulder
Additional information is available.
Keywords:
Newton's 1st Law, Newton's 2nd Law, acceleration, forces, free body diagrams, friction
Record Cloner:
Metadata instance created October 3, 2006 by Caroline Hall
Record Updated:
March 20, 2014 by Caroline Hall
Last Update
when Cataloged:
March 3, 2006
Other Collections:

AAAS Benchmark Alignments (2008 Version)

4. The Physical Setting

4F. Motion
  • 3-5: 4F/E1bc. The greater the force is, the greater the change in motion will be. The more massive an object is, the less effect a given force will have.
  • 6-8: 4F/M3a. An unbalanced force acting on an object changes its speed or direction of motion, or both.
  • 9-12: 4F/H1. The change in motion (direction or speed) of an object is proportional to the applied force and inversely proportional to the mass.
  • 9-12: 4F/H2. All motion is relative to whatever frame of reference is chosen, for there is no motionless frame from which to judge all motion.
  • 9-12: 4F/H7. In most familiar situations, frictional forces complicate the description of motion, although the basic principles still apply.
  • 9-12: 4F/H8. Any object maintains a constant speed and direction of motion unless an unbalanced outside force acts on it.

9. The Mathematical World

9B. Symbolic Relationships
  • 6-8: 9B/M3. Graphs can show a variety of possible relationships between two variables. As one variable increases uniformly, the other may do one of the following: increase or decrease steadily, increase or decrease faster and faster, get closer and closer to some limiting value, reach some intermediate maximum or minimum, alternately increase and decrease, increase or decrease in steps, or do something different from any of these.
  • 9-12: 9B/H3. Any mathematical model, graphic or algebraic, is limited in how well it can represent how the world works. The usefulness of a mathematical model for predicting may be limited by uncertainties in measurements, by neglect of some important influences, or by requiring too much computation.
  • 9-12: 9B/H4. Tables, graphs, and symbols are alternative ways of representing data and relationships that can be translated from one to another.

11. Common Themes

11B. Models
  • 6-8: 11B/M4. Simulations are often useful in modeling events and processes.
  • 6-8: 11B/M5. The usefulness of a model depends on how closely its behavior matches key aspects of what is being modeled. The only way to determine the usefulness of a model is to compare its behavior to the behavior of the real-world object, event, or process being modeled.

Next Generation Science Standards

Disciplinary Core Ideas (K-12)

Forces and Motion (PS2.A)
  • For any pair of interacting objects, the force exerted by the first object on the second object is equal in strength to the force that the second object exerts on the first, but in the opposite direction (Newton's third law). (6-8)
  • The motion of an object is determined by the sum of the forces acting on it; if the total force on the object is not zero, its motion will change. The greater the mass of the object, the greater the force needed to achieve the same change in motion. For any given object, a larger force causes a larger change in motion. (6-8)
  • Newton's second law accurately predicts changes in the motion of macroscopic objects. (9-12)
Types of Interactions (PS2.B)
  • The gravitational force of Earth acting on an object near Earth's surface pulls that object toward the planet's center. (5)

Science and Engineering Practices (K-12)

Developing and Using Models (K-12)
  • Modeling in 6–8 builds on K–5 and progresses to developing, using and revising models to describe, test, and predict more abstract phenomena and design systems. (6-8)
    • Develop and use a model to describe phenomena. (6-8)
  • Modeling in 9–12 builds on K–8 and progresses to using, synthesizing, and developing models to predict and show relationships among variables between systems and their components in the natural and designed worlds. (9-12)
    • Use a model to provide mechanistic accounts of phenomena. (9-12)
Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking (5-12)
  • Mathematical and computational thinking at the 9–12 level builds on K–8 and progresses to using algebraic thinking and analysis, a range of linear and nonlinear functions including trigonometric functions, exponentials and logarithms, and computational tools for statistical analysis to analyze, represent, and model data. Simple computational simulations are created and used based on mathematical models of basic assumptions. (9-12)
    • Use mathematical representations of phenomena to describe explanations. (9-12)
    • Create or revise a simulation of a phenomenon, designed device, process, or system. (9-12)
ComPADRE is beta testing Citation Styles!

Record Link
AIP Format
(Physics Education Technology Project, Boulder, 2005), WWW Document, (http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/forces-1d).
AJP/PRST-PER
PhET Simulation: Forces in 1 Dimension (Physics Education Technology Project, Boulder, 2005), <http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/forces-1d>.
APA Format
PhET Simulation: Forces in 1 Dimension. (2006, March 3). Retrieved July 25, 2014, from Physics Education Technology Project: http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/forces-1d
Chicago Format
Physics Education Technology Project. PhET Simulation: Forces in 1 Dimension. Boulder: Physics Education Technology Project, March 3, 2006. http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/forces-1d (accessed 25 July 2014).
MLA Format
PhET Simulation: Forces in 1 Dimension. Boulder: Physics Education Technology Project, 2005. 3 Mar. 2006. 25 July 2014 <http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/forces-1d>.
BibTeX Export Format
@misc{ Title = {PhET Simulation: Forces in 1 Dimension}, Publisher = {Physics Education Technology Project}, Volume = {2014}, Number = {25 July 2014}, Month = {March 3, 2006}, Year = {2005} }
Refer Export Format

%T PhET Simulation: Forces in 1 Dimension
%D March 3, 2006
%I Physics Education Technology Project
%C Boulder
%U http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/forces-1d
%O application/java

EndNote Export Format

%0 Electronic Source
%D March 3, 2006
%T PhET Simulation: Forces in 1 Dimension
%I Physics Education Technology Project
%V 2014
%N 25 July 2014
%8 March 3, 2006
%9 application/java
%U http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/forces-1d


Disclaimer: ComPADRE offers citation styles as a guide only. We cannot offer interpretations about citations as this is an automated procedure. Please refer to the style manuals in the Citation Source Information area for clarifications.

Citation Source Information

The AIP Style presented is based on information from the AIP Style Manual.

The APA Style presented is based on information from APA Style.org: Electronic References.

The Chicago Style presented is based on information from Examples of Chicago-Style Documentation.

The MLA Style presented is based on information from the MLA FAQ.

This resource is stored in 23 shared folders.

You must login to access shared folders.

PhET Simulation: Forces in 1 Dimension:

Is a Teaching Guide For Physics Classroom: Newton's Second Law

Know of another related resource? Login to relate this resource to it.
Save to my folders

Supplements

Contribute

Related Materials

Similar Materials