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Physical Review Special Topics - Physics Education Research
written by Gerd Kortemeyer
An important result of physics education research is that students' learning and success in a course is correlated with their beliefs, attitudes, and expectations regarding physics. However, it is hard to assess these beliefs for individual students, and traditional survey instruments such as the Maryland Physics Expectations Survey (MPEX) are intended to evaluate the impact of one or more semesters of instruction on an overall class and improve teaching. In this study, we investigate the possibility of using the analysis of online student discussion behavior as an indicator of an individual student's approach to physics. These discussions are not tainted by the effects of self-reporting, and are gathered in authentic nonresearch settings, where students attempt to solve problems in the way that they believe is most efficient and appropriate. We calculate the correlation of both MPEX and student discussions with different measures of student learning, and find that on an individual base, student discussions are a stronger predictor of success than MPEX outcomes.
Subjects Levels Resource Types
Education Foundations
- Student Characteristics
General Physics
- Physics Education Research
- Lower Undergraduate
- Reference Material
= Research study
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© 2007 Gerd Kortemeyer
DOI:
10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.3.010101
NSF Numbers:
0085921
0243126
PACS:
01.40.Fk
Keywords:
discussion participation, student expectations
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created February 7, 2007 by Lyle Barbato
Record Updated:
July 13, 2013 by Lyle Barbato
Last Update
when Cataloged:
January 30, 2007
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Record Link
AIP Format
G. Kortemeyer, Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 3 (1), 010101 (2007), WWW Document, (http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.3.010101).
AJP/PRST-PER
G. Kortemeyer, Correlations between student discussion behavior, attitudes, and learning, Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 3 (1), 010101 (2007), <http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.3.010101>.
APA Format
Kortemeyer, G. (2007, January 30). Correlations between student discussion behavior, attitudes, and learning. Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res., 3(1), 010101. Retrieved December 18, 2017, from http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.3.010101
Chicago Format
Kortemeyer, Gerd. "Correlations between student discussion behavior, attitudes, and learning." Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 3, no. 1, (January 30, 2007): 010101, http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.3.010101 (accessed 18 December 2017).
MLA Format
Kortemeyer, Gerd. "Correlations between student discussion behavior, attitudes, and learning." Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 3.1 (2007): 010101. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.3.010101>.
BibTeX Export Format
@article{ Author = "Gerd Kortemeyer", Title = {Correlations between student discussion behavior, attitudes, and learning}, Journal = {Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res.}, Volume = {3}, Number = {1}, Pages = {010101}, Month = {January}, Year = {2007} }
Refer Export Format

%A Gerd Kortemeyer
%T Correlations between student discussion behavior, attitudes, and learning
%J Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res.
%V 3
%N 1
%D January 30, 2007
%P 010101
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.3.010101
%O application/pdf

EndNote Export Format

%0 Journal Article
%A Kortemeyer, Gerd
%D January 30, 2007
%T Correlations between student discussion behavior, attitudes, and learning
%J Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res.
%V 3
%N 1
%P 010101
%8 January 30, 2007
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.3.010101


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