Detail Page

Item Picture
written by Tom Henderson
This tutorial introduces the concept of gravitational acceleration. This tutorial explains the notation, numerical value, and how the numerical value of the gravitational acceleration is obtained.

This tutorial includes two widgets: one where one can see the strength of the acceleration of gravity from any location on Earth, and another one where one can see a comparison of the acceleration of gravity of planets in our solar system to everyday objects, and to other objects in the solar system. The tutorial also includes a pictorial example, along with the widgets, along with links to tutorials to other general Physics concepts, simulations, and student activities.


This is part of The Physics Classroom. This web site also includes interactive tools to help students with concepts and problem solving, worksheets for student assignments, and recommendations for simple introductory laboratories.
Subjects Levels Resource Types
Classical Mechanics
- Motion in One Dimension
= Gravitational Acceleration
- High School
- Lower Undergraduate
- Instructional Material
= Tutorial
- Audio/Visual
= Illustration
Intended Users Formats Ratings
- Learners
- text/html
- image/gif
  • Currently 0.0/5

Want to rate this material?
Login here!


Access Rights:
Free access
Restriction:
© 1996 Tom Henderson
Keywords:
P/T graph, Position vs. Time, V/T graph, Velocity vs. Time, constant acceleration, free fall, gravitation, gravitational field, gravity, position graph, tutorial, velocity graph
Record Cloner:
Metadata instance created March 28, 2011 by Tom Henderson
Record Updated:
June 15, 2012 by Zachary Davis
Last Update
when Cataloged:
July 1, 2011
Other Collections:

AAAS Benchmark Alignments (2008 Version)

4. The Physical Setting

4B. The Earth
  • 6-8: 4B/M3. Everything on or anywhere near the earth is pulled toward the earth's center by gravitational force.
4F. Motion
  • 6-8: 4F/M3a. An unbalanced force acting on an object changes its speed or direction of motion, or both.
  • 9-12: 4F/H1. The change in motion (direction or speed) of an object is proportional to the applied force and inversely proportional to the mass.
4G. Forces of Nature
  • 9-12: 4G/H1. Gravitational force is an attraction between masses. The strength of the force is proportional to the masses and weakens rapidly with increasing distance between them.

9. The Mathematical World

9B. Symbolic Relationships
  • 9-12: 9B/H5. When a relationship is represented in symbols, numbers can be substituted for all but one of the symbols and the possible value of the remaining symbol computed. Sometimes the relationship may be satisfied by one value, sometimes by more than one, and sometimes not at all.
ComPADRE is beta testing Citation Styles!

Record Link
AIP Format
T. Henderson, (1996), WWW Document, (http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/1DKin/U1L5b.cfm).
AJP/PRST-PER
T. Henderson, Physics Classroom: The Acceleration of Gravity, (1996), <http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/1DKin/U1L5b.cfm>.
APA Format
Henderson, T. (2011, July 1). Physics Classroom: The Acceleration of Gravity. Retrieved October 24, 2014, from http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/1DKin/U1L5b.cfm
Chicago Format
Henderson, Tom. Physics Classroom: The Acceleration of Gravity. July 1, 2011. http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/1DKin/U1L5b.cfm (accessed 24 October 2014).
MLA Format
Henderson, Tom. Physics Classroom: The Acceleration of Gravity. 1996. 1 July 2011. 24 Oct. 2014 <http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/1DKin/U1L5b.cfm>.
BibTeX Export Format
@misc{ Author = "Tom Henderson", Title = {Physics Classroom: The Acceleration of Gravity}, Volume = {2014}, Number = {24 October 2014}, Month = {July 1, 2011}, Year = {1996} }
Refer Export Format

%A Tom Henderson
%T Physics Classroom: The Acceleration of Gravity
%D July 1, 2011
%U http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/1DKin/U1L5b.cfm
%O text/html

EndNote Export Format

%0 Electronic Source
%A Henderson, Tom
%D July 1, 2011
%T Physics Classroom: The Acceleration of Gravity
%V 2014
%N 24 October 2014
%8 July 1, 2011
%9 text/html
%U http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/1DKin/U1L5b.cfm


Disclaimer: ComPADRE offers citation styles as a guide only. We cannot offer interpretations about citations as this is an automated procedure. Please refer to the style manuals in the Citation Source Information area for clarifications.

Citation Source Information

The AIP Style presented is based on information from the AIP Style Manual.

The APA Style presented is based on information from APA Style.org: Electronic References.

The Chicago Style presented is based on information from Examples of Chicago-Style Documentation.

The MLA Style presented is based on information from the MLA FAQ.

This resource is stored in 3 shared folders.

You must login to access shared folders.

Physics Classroom: The Acceleration of Gravity:

Has Teaching Guide Free Fall Model

This EJS simulation from Open Source Physics (OSP) will help students understand the many representations of free fall.

relation by Tom Henderson
Has Student Extra Flickr Physics

Visit The Physics Classroom's Flickr Galleries and take a visual overview of 1D Kinematics.

relation by Tom Henderson
Has Teaching Guide The Laboratory

Looking for a lab that coordinates with this page? Try the Free Fall Lab from The Laboratory. Requires motion detectors.

relation by Tom Henderson
Has Teaching Guide Curriculum Corner

Learning requires action. Give your students this sense-making activity from The Curriculum Corner.

relation by Tom Henderson

Know of another related resource? Login to relate this resource to it.
Save to my folders

Supplements

Contribute

Related Materials

Has Teaching Guide

Free Fall Model

Has Student Extra

Flickr Physics

Has Teaching Guide

The Laboratory

More...

Similar Materials