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Educational Psychologist
written by Frederick Reif and Joan I. Heller
This article presents a prescriptive analysis of the kinds of knowledge and procedures leading to effective human problem solving in a quantitative science such as physics. The knowledge about such a science, explicated in the case of mechanics, specifies special descriptive concepts and relations described at various levels of abstractness, is organized hierarchically, and is accompanied by explicit guidelines specifying when and how this knowledge is to be applied. General problem-solving procedures, to be used in conjunction with such domain-specific knowledge, specify how initially to describe and analyze any problem so as to facilitate its subsequent solution; how to search for a solution by methods of constraint satisfaction used together with heuristic methods for decomposing problems and exploring decisions; and how to assess whether the resulting solution is correct and reasonably optimal. The preceding model of effective human problem solving is compared with some relevant observations and with special experiments designed to test such a prescriptive model. It also suggests methods for teaching students improved scientific problem-solving skills.
Educational Psychologist: Volume 17, Issue 2, Pages 102-127
Subjects Levels Resource Types
Education Foundations
- Behavior
Education Practices
- Active Learning
= Problem Solving
General Physics
- Physics Education Research
- Lower Undergraduate
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© 1982 American Psychological Association
DOI:
10.1080/00461528209529248
Keyword:
mechanics
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created July 14, 2005 by Lyle Barbato
Record Updated:
January 26, 2011 by Lyle Barbato
Last Update
when Cataloged:
July 1, 1982
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Record Link
AIP Format
F. Reif and J. Heller, Educ. Psychol. 17 (2), 102 (1982), WWW Document, (http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00461528209529248).
AJP/PRST-PER
F. Reif and J. Heller, Knowledge Structure and Problem Solving in Physics, Educ. Psychol. 17 (2), 102 (1982), <http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00461528209529248>.
APA Format
Reif, F., & Heller, J. (1982, July 1). Knowledge Structure and Problem Solving in Physics. Educ. Psychol., 17(2), 102-127. Retrieved December 17, 2017, from http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00461528209529248
Chicago Format
Reif, Frederick, and Joan I. Heller. "Knowledge Structure and Problem Solving in Physics." Educ. Psychol. 17, no. 2, (July 1, 1982): 102-127, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00461528209529248 (accessed 17 December 2017).
MLA Format
Reif, Frederick, and Joan I. Heller. "Knowledge Structure and Problem Solving in Physics." Educ. Psychol. 17.2 (1982): 102-127. 17 Dec. 2017 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00461528209529248>.
BibTeX Export Format
@article{ Author = "Frederick Reif and Joan I. Heller", Title = {Knowledge Structure and Problem Solving in Physics}, Journal = {Educ. Psychol.}, Volume = {17}, Number = {2}, Pages = {102-127}, Month = {July}, Year = {1982} }
Refer Export Format

%A Frederick Reif
%A Joan I. Heller
%T Knowledge Structure and Problem Solving in Physics
%J Educ. Psychol.
%V 17
%N 2
%D July 1, 1982
%P 102-127
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00461528209529248
%O text/html

EndNote Export Format

%0 Journal Article
%A Reif, Frederick
%A Heller, Joan I.
%D July 1, 1982
%T Knowledge Structure and Problem Solving in Physics
%J Educ. Psychol.
%V 17
%N 2
%P 102-127
%8 July 1, 1982
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00461528209529248


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