Detail Page

Science Education
written by Ibrahim Halloun
High school and college students often carry out of traditional physics courses loose bundles of vague and undifferentiated concepts about physical objects and their properties. Within the framework of schematic modeling, a scientific concept can be defined explicitly with five schematic dimensions: domain, organization, quantification, expression, and employment. Based on the level of commensurability between scientific concepts and individual students' own concepts, students' cognitive evolution into the scientific realm can take different directions ranging from reinforcing existing concepts to constructing novel ones on completely new foundations. Such evolution is promoted in a student-centered, model-based instruction. The newtonian concept of force is discussed for illustration, along with the results of tutoring two groups of Lebanese students to develop this concept in a schematic modeling approach.
Science Education: Volume 82, Issue 2, Pages 239-263
Subjects Levels Resource Types
Education Foundations
- Cognition
Education Practices
- Active Learning
= Modeling
General Physics
- Physics Education Research
- Lower Undergraduate
- High School
- Reference Material
= Research study
Intended Users Formats Ratings
- Educators
- Researchers
- application/pdf
- non-digital
  • Currently 0.0/5

Want to rate this material?
Login here!


Access Rights:
Available by subscription
Restriction:
© 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
DOI:
10.1002/(SICI)1098-237X(199804)82:2<239::AID-SCE7>3.0.CO;2-F
Keywords:
Cognitive Processes, Concept Formation, Elementary Secondary Education, Epistemology, Force, Mechanics (Physics), Models, Physics, Prior Learning, Scientific Concepts
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created July 13, 2005 by Lyle Barbato
Record Updated:
September 23, 2007 by Lyle Barbato
Last Update
when Cataloged:
December 7, 1998
Other Collections:

ComPADRE is beta testing Citation Styles!

Record Link
AIP Format
I. Halloun, Sci. Educ. 82 (2), 239 (1998), WWW Document, (http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1098-237X(199804)82:2%3C239::AID-SCE7%3E3.0.CO;2-F).
AJP/PRST-PER
I. Halloun, Schematic concepts for schematic models of the real world: The Newtonian concept of force, Sci. Educ. 82 (2), 239 (1998), <http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1098-237X(199804)82:2%3C239::AID-SCE7%3E3.0.CO;2-F>.
APA Format
Halloun, I. (1998, December 7). Schematic concepts for schematic models of the real world: The Newtonian concept of force. Sci. Educ., 82(2), 239-263. Retrieved December 17, 2017, from http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1098-237X(199804)82:2%3C239::AID-SCE7%3E3.0.CO;2-F
Chicago Format
Halloun, Ibrahim. "Schematic concepts for schematic models of the real world: The Newtonian concept of force." Sci. Educ. 82, no. 2, (December 7, 1998): 239-263, http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1098-237X(199804)82:2%3C239::AID-SCE7%3E3.0.CO;2-F (accessed 17 December 2017).
MLA Format
Halloun, Ibrahim. "Schematic concepts for schematic models of the real world: The Newtonian concept of force." Sci. Educ. 82.2 (1998): 239-263. 17 Dec. 2017 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1098-237X(199804)82:2%3C239::AID-SCE7%3E3.0.CO;2-F>.
BibTeX Export Format
@article{ Author = "Ibrahim Halloun", Title = {Schematic concepts for schematic models of the real world: The Newtonian concept of force}, Journal = {Sci. Educ.}, Volume = {82}, Number = {2}, Pages = {239-263}, Month = {December}, Year = {1998} }
Refer Export Format

%A Ibrahim Halloun
%T Schematic concepts for schematic models of the real world: The Newtonian concept of force
%J Sci. Educ.
%V 82
%N 2
%D December 7, 1998
%P 239-263
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1098-237X(199804)82:2%3C239::AID-SCE7%3E3.0.CO;2-F
%O application/pdf

EndNote Export Format

%0 Journal Article
%A Halloun, Ibrahim
%D December 7, 1998
%T Schematic concepts for schematic models of the real world: The Newtonian concept of force
%J Sci. Educ.
%V 82
%N 2
%P 239-263
%8 December 7, 1998
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1098-237X(199804)82:2%3C239::AID-SCE7%3E3.0.CO;2-F


Disclaimer: ComPADRE offers citation styles as a guide only. We cannot offer interpretations about citations as this is an automated procedure. Please refer to the style manuals in the Citation Source Information area for clarifications.

Citation Source Information

The AIP Style presented is based on information from the AIP Style Manual.

The APA Style presented is based on information from APA Style.org: Electronic References.

The Chicago Style presented is based on information from Examples of Chicago-Style Documentation.

The MLA Style presented is based on information from the MLA FAQ.

Save to my folders

Contribute

Similar Materials