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Physical Review Physics Education Research
written by Nathan Crossette, Lincoln D. Carr, and Bethany R. Wilcox
Social network analysis (SNA) has been gaining traction as a technique for quantitatively studying student collaboration. We analyze networks, constructed from student self-reports of collaboration on homework assignments, in two courses from the University of Colorado Boulder and one course from the Colorado School of Mines. All three courses occurred during the COVID-19 pandemic, which allows for a comparison between the course at the Colorado School of Mines (in a fully remote format) with results from a previous pre-pandemic study at the Colorado School of Mines (in an in-person format), as well as comparison between the Mines results with the two University of Colorado courses (in a hybrid format). We compute nodal centrality measures and calculate the correlation between student centrality and performance. Results varied widely. The course at the Colorado School of Mines had strong correlations between many centrality measures and performance which matched the patterns seen in the pre-pandemic study. The courses at the University of Colorado Boulder showed weaker correlations, and one course showed nearly no correlations at all between students' connectivity to their classmates and their performance. Taken together, the results from the trio of courses indicate that the context and environment in which the course is situated play a more important role in fostering a correlation between student collaboration and course performance than the format (remote, hybrid, in-person) of the course, a finding which has implications for the broader use of SNA within physics education research. We also conducted a short study on the effect that missing nodes may have on the correlations calculated from the measured networks, an analysis largely missing from the SNA literature within PER. This investigation showed that missing nodes tend to shift correlations towards zero, providing evidence that the significant correlations measured in our networks are not spurious.
Physical Review Physics Education Research: Volume 19, Issue 1, Pages 010106
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Access Rights:
Free access
License:
This material is released under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license.
Rights Holder:
American Physical Society
DOI:
10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.19.010106
NSF Numbers:
CCF-1839232
DMR-2002980
DGE-2125899
PHY-2210566
Keywords:
centrality measures, hybrid course collaboration, nodal networks, online collaboration, pandemic effects on collaboration, social network analysis
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created February 28, 2023 by Lyle Barbato
Record Updated:
March 22, 2023 by Caroline Hall
Last Update
when Cataloged:
February 8, 2023
Other Collections:

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AIP Format
N. Crossette, L. Carr, and B. Wilcox, , Phys. Rev. Phys. Educ. Res. 19 (1), 010106 (2023), WWW Document, (https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.19.010106).
AJP/PRST-PER
N. Crossette, L. Carr, and B. Wilcox, Correlations between student connectivity and academic performance: A pandemic follow-up, Phys. Rev. Phys. Educ. Res. 19 (1), 010106 (2023), <https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.19.010106>.
APA Format
Crossette, N., Carr, L., & Wilcox, B. (2023, February 8). Correlations between student connectivity and academic performance: A pandemic follow-up. Phys. Rev. Phys. Educ. Res., 19(1), 010106. Retrieved May 18, 2024, from https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.19.010106
Chicago Format
Crossette, N, L. Carr, and B. Wilcox. "Correlations between student connectivity and academic performance: A pandemic follow-up." Phys. Rev. Phys. Educ. Res. 19, no. 1, (February 8, 2023): 010106, https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.19.010106 (accessed 18 May 2024).
MLA Format
Crossette, Nathan, Lincoln Carr, and Bethany Wilcox. "Correlations between student connectivity and academic performance: A pandemic follow-up." Phys. Rev. Phys. Educ. Res. 19.1 (2023): 010106. 18 May 2024 <https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.19.010106>.
BibTeX Export Format
@article{ Author = "Nathan Crossette and Lincoln Carr and Bethany Wilcox", Title = {Correlations between student connectivity and academic performance: A pandemic follow-up}, Journal = {Phys. Rev. Phys. Educ. Res.}, Volume = {19}, Number = {1}, Pages = {010106}, Month = {February}, Year = {2023} }
Refer Export Format

%A Nathan Crossette %A Lincoln Carr %A Bethany Wilcox %T Correlations between student connectivity and academic performance: A pandemic follow-up %J Phys. Rev. Phys. Educ. Res. %V 19 %N 1 %D February 8, 2023 %P 010106 %U https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.19.010106 %O application/pdf

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%0 Journal Article %A Crossette, Nathan %A Carr, Lincoln %A Wilcox, Bethany %D February 8, 2023 %T Correlations between student connectivity and academic performance: A pandemic follow-up %J Phys. Rev. Phys. Educ. Res. %V 19 %N 1 %P 010106 %8 February 8, 2023 %U https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.19.010106


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