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Physical Review Physics Education Research
written by Sonja Cwik and Chandralekha Singh
Students' self-efficacy in physics classes can play a key role in shaping course outcomes. Prior research has shown that women have a lower self-efficacy than men in calculus-based introductory physics courses. We administered a validated survey to 564 students to investigate the gender differences in self-efficacy and how it predicts student grades at the end of a mandatory two-semester introductory physics course sequence primarily for bioscience majors in which women outnumber men. We used structural equation modeling to investigate how students' self-efficacy predicts female and male students' grade at the end of the course. We found that women had a lower self-efficacy and grade than men and that the students' self-efficacy played a major role in predicting students' grade even though women outnumbered men in this physics course. This study hints at the fact that numerical representation alone is not sufficient, e.g., to mitigate the effects of deep-rooted societal stereotypes and biases related to who belongs in physics and can excel in it. Thus, it is important for physics instructors to be intentional about creating equitable and inclusive learning environments in which all students, particularly those from traditionally marginalized groups such as women, have high self-efficacy and can thrive.
Physical Review Physics Education Research: Volume 18, Issue 2, Pages 020142
Subjects Levels Resource Types
Classical Mechanics
- General
Education Foundations
- Achievement
- Sample Population
= Gender
- Societal Issues
= Gender Issues
- Student Characteristics
= Affect
Education Practices
- Learning Environment
- Recruitment
= Diversity
General Physics
- Physics Education Research
Other Sciences
- Life Sciences
- Lower Undergraduate
- Reference Material
= Research study
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Access Rights:
Free access
License:
This material is released under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license.
Rights Holder:
American Physical Society
DOI:
10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.18.020142
NSF Number:
DUE-1524575
Keywords:
Expectancy Value Theory, Motivational Theory, belongingness, gender equity, growth mindset, inclusivity, physics identity, self determination
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created December 21, 2022 by Sam McKagan
Record Updated:
February 15, 2023 by Caroline Hall
Last Update
when Cataloged:
December 5, 2022
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AIP Format
S. Cwik and C. Singh, , Phys. Rev. Phys. Educ. Res. 18 (2), 020142 (2022), WWW Document, (https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.18.020142).
AJP/PRST-PER
S. Cwik and C. Singh, Gender differences in students’ self-efficacy in introductory physics courses in which women outnumber men predict their grade, Phys. Rev. Phys. Educ. Res. 18 (2), 020142 (2022), <https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.18.020142>.
APA Format
Cwik, S., & Singh, C. (2022, December 5). Gender differences in students’ self-efficacy in introductory physics courses in which women outnumber men predict their grade. Phys. Rev. Phys. Educ. Res., 18(2), 020142. Retrieved December 3, 2023, from https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.18.020142
Chicago Format
Cwik, Sonja, and Chandralekha Singh. "Gender differences in students’ self-efficacy in introductory physics courses in which women outnumber men predict their grade." Phys. Rev. Phys. Educ. Res. 18, no. 2, (December 5, 2022): 020142, https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.18.020142 (accessed 3 December 2023).
MLA Format
Cwik, Sonja, and Chandralekha Singh. "Gender differences in students’ self-efficacy in introductory physics courses in which women outnumber men predict their grade." Phys. Rev. Phys. Educ. Res. 18.2 (2022): 020142. 3 Dec. 2023 <https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.18.020142>.
BibTeX Export Format
@article{ Author = "Sonja Cwik and Chandralekha Singh", Title = {Gender differences in students’ self-efficacy in introductory physics courses in which women outnumber men predict their grade}, Journal = {Phys. Rev. Phys. Educ. Res.}, Volume = {18}, Number = {2}, Pages = {020142}, Month = {December}, Year = {2022} }
Refer Export Format

%A Sonja Cwik %A Chandralekha Singh %T Gender differences in students' self-efficacy in introductory physics courses in which women outnumber men predict their grade %J Phys. Rev. Phys. Educ. Res. %V 18 %N 2 %D December 5, 2022 %P 020142 %U https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.18.020142 %O application/pdf

EndNote Export Format

%0 Journal Article %A Cwik, Sonja %A Singh, Chandralekha %D December 5, 2022 %T Gender differences in students' self-efficacy in introductory physics courses in which women outnumber men predict their grade %J Phys. Rev. Phys. Educ. Res. %V 18 %N 2 %P 020142 %8 December 5, 2022 %U https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.18.020142


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Gender differences in students’ self-efficacy in introductory physics courses in which women outnumber men predict their grade:

Is By The Same Author and Covers a Similar Topic As Investigating Gender Differences in Students’ Motivational Beliefs and Inclusiveness of the Learning Environment in Introductory Physics Courses for Bioscience Majors

A link to Sonja Cwik's doctoral dissertation detailing the full scope of qualitative and quantitative research on the role of inclusivity in students' motivational beliefs.

relation by Caroline Hall

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