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Physical Review Special Topics - Physics Education Research
written by Edgar D. Corpuz and N. Sanjay Rebello
Our previous research showed that students' mental models of friction at the atomic level are significantly influenced by their macroscopic ideas. For most students, friction is due to the meshing of bumps and valleys and rubbing of atoms. The aforementioned results motivated us to further investigate how students can be helped to improve their present models of microscopic friction. Teaching interviews were conducted to study the dynamics of their model construction as they interacted with the interviewer, the scaffolding activities, and/or with each other. In this paper, we present the different scaffolding activities and the variation in the ideas that students generated as they did the hands-on and minds-on scaffolding activities. Results imply that through a series of carefully designed scaffolding activities, it is possible to facilitate the refinement of students' ideas of microscopic friction.
Subjects Levels Resource Types
Classical Mechanics
- Applications of Newton's Laws
= Friction
Education Foundations
- Cognition
= Cognition Development
Education Practices
- Curriculum Development
- Instructional Material Design
- Lower Undergraduate
- Graduate/Professional
- Reference Material
= Research study
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© 2011 American Physical Society
DOI:
10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.7.020103
NSF Number:
0133621
PACSs:
01.40.Fk
01.40.E-
01.40.Ha
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created April 30, 2012 by Lyle Barbato
Record Updated:
April 30, 2012 by Lyle Barbato
Last Update
when Cataloged:
July 26, 2011
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AIP Format
E. Corpuz and N. Rebello, , Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 7 (2), 020103 (2011), WWW Document, (https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.7.020103).
AJP/PRST-PER
E. Corpuz and N. Rebello, Investigating students’ mental models and knowledge construction of microscopic friction. II. Implications for curriculum design and development, Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 7 (2), 020103 (2011), <https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.7.020103>.
APA Format
Corpuz, E., & Rebello, N. (2011, July 26). Investigating students’ mental models and knowledge construction of microscopic friction. II. Implications for curriculum design and development. Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res., 7(2), 020103. Retrieved April 14, 2024, from https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.7.020103
Chicago Format
Corpuz, Edgar, and N. Sanjay Rebello. "Investigating students’ mental models and knowledge construction of microscopic friction. II. Implications for curriculum design and development." Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 7, no. 2, (July 26, 2011): 020103, https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.7.020103 (accessed 14 April 2024).
MLA Format
Corpuz, Edgar, and N. Sanjay Rebello. "Investigating students’ mental models and knowledge construction of microscopic friction. II. Implications for curriculum design and development." Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 7.2 (2011): 020103. 14 Apr. 2024 <https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.7.020103>.
BibTeX Export Format
@article{ Author = "Edgar Corpuz and N. Sanjay Rebello", Title = {Investigating students’ mental models and knowledge construction of microscopic friction. II. Implications for curriculum design and development}, Journal = {Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res.}, Volume = {7}, Number = {2}, Pages = {020103}, Month = {July}, Year = {2011} }
Refer Export Format

%A Edgar Corpuz %A N. Sanjay Rebello %T Investigating students' mental models and knowledge construction of microscopic friction. II. Implications for curriculum design and development %J Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. %V 7 %N 2 %D July 26, 2011 %P 020103 %U https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.7.020103 %O application/pdf

EndNote Export Format

%0 Journal Article %A Corpuz, Edgar %A Rebello, N. Sanjay %D July 26, 2011 %T Investigating students' mental models and knowledge construction of microscopic friction. II. Implications for curriculum design and development %J Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. %V 7 %N 2 %P 020103 %8 July 26, 2011 %U https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.7.020103


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