PICUP Virtual Meeting Archive

PICUP Fall Webinar Series: Integrating Computation Across the Curriculum at IUPUI

Thursday, October 28, 2021
5:00 PM Pacific | 6:00 PM Mountain | 7:00 PM Central | 8:00 PM Eastern
Zoom Link: https://csuchico.zoom.us/j/84982761396?pwd=UElBRmVzLzhlcDI0MnlGbXpqVWttdz09

The Physics Department at IUPUI is now in the fourth year of an initiative to implement computational methods across all undergraduate physics classes at IUPUI. Our goal is ambitious: for approximately 25% of all assignments to be computational by 2023. During this webinar, we will give an overview of this initiative from its inception through the present. We'll emphasize our department's change process, the mistakes we've made, and lessons learned. We'll also discuss the assessment tool we have developed, preliminary results, and next steps.  We will leave plenty of time for Q&A.

Presenters:

Andy Gavrin is Associate Professor of physics at IUPUI. He is active in physics education research, and was Chair of the department for the first three years of the project.

Gautam Vemuri is Professor of Physics at IUPUI. His research is focused on laser physics and nonlinear optics. As part of the project, he developed and now teaches the "Introduction to Computational Physics" course.

PICUP Fall Webinar Series: A Beginner's Guide to PICUP

September 29, 2021
5:00 PM Pacific | 6:00 PM Mountain | 7:00 PM Central | 8:00 PM Eastern
Zoom Link: https://csuchico.zoom.us/j/84982761396?pwd=UElBRmVzLzhlcDI0MnlGbXpqVWttdz09


The Partnership for Integration of Computation into Undergraduate Physics’ (PICUP) mission is described in its name, but how exactly do we do that? You probably know some of what PICUP does, but did you know that we:

* Host in-person and online intensive faculty development workshops each summer?

* Have regular webinars during the academic year?

* Curate an ever-growing collection of pedagogical resources?

* Host a vibrant online community of computational physics enthusiasts?

* Have been supported by NSF funding?

Join us to explore what PICUP does and see how you (or any colleagues you invite) can get involved in the partnership!

PICUP Spring Webinar Series
Physics for Tomorrow: Contemporary Enhancements to the Undergraduate

When: Tuesday, June 1, 2021 at 5:30pm PDT | 6:30pm MDT | 7:30pm CDT | 8:30pm EDT

For years PICUP has advocated the integration of a significant computational component into the undergraduate physics curriculum. But computation is just part of a broader set of enhancements to the curriculum that should be made to accommodate the career prospects of contemporary physics students. In this meeting there will be a short presentation regarding what a contemporary undergraduate physics curriculum might include, followed by stimulating discussion. All are invited to attend, participate, and provide input on this important topic.

This webinar is co-sponsored by Physics for Tomorrow, a burgeoning group of physics faculty from the ALPhA,  PIPELINE Network, and  PICUP communities dedicated to improving the physics experience for undergraduates.

The webinar was recorded for your viewing pleasure.

PICUP Spring Webinar Series: The Future of Remote Learning in Physics

When: Tuesday, May 18 at 5:30PDT | 6:30MDT | 7:30CDT | 8:30EDT
Guest Presenters: KC Walsh, Oregon State University and Walter Freeman, Syracuse University

After more than a year of being compelled to engage in remote instruction, a return to a conventional, in-person educational experience is overwhelmingly desired; yet, it is also becoming clear that certain aspects of remote learning will (and probably should) continue even when the pandemic has passed. There will be short presentations followed by time for discussion.

Join Zoom Meeting
https://csuchico.zoom.us/j/82664938486?pwd=VGdteVIwYU8vTHFwVE5HelIxb2YrUT09


Meeting ID: 826 6493 8486
Passcode: PICUP

PICUP Spring Webinar Series: Computational Thinking in K-16 STEM Education

Thursday, February 25 at 6:00pm PT | 7:00pm MT | 8:00pm CT | 9:00pm ET

Join Zoom Meeting
https://csuchico.zoom.us/j/86333107371?pwd=Q0ppczV3dXY5ZDIrUTE3UFpzeEpYZz09
Meeting ID: 863 3310 7371
Passcode: PICUP

Guest Presenter: Terrie Galanti, University of North Florida

How do we inspire our STEM students to perceive computation as a creative and innovative endeavor? In her talk titled "Meaning Making in Computational Thinking", Dr. Terrie Galanti draws upon her experiences as an electrical engineer, high school mathematics teacher, and K-16 STEM Education researcher to ponder logical thinking though the eyes of the learner. As they respond to questions that make computational thinking visible, students can grow to see themselves as productive STEM thinkers.

Not available next Thursday evening? The webinar will be recorded for your viewing pleasure.

PICUP Spring Webinar Series: Computation in Undergrad Physics with an Emphasis on Using MATLAB

When: Thursday, January 28 at 6:00pm PT | 7:00pm MT | 8:00pm CT | 9:00pm ET
Where: Join Zoom Meeting
https://csuchico.zoom.us/j/89592978602?pwd=UTRENWhQWHRDdFNqMElzdWJ1Zk1qQT09
Meeting ID: 895 9297 8602
Passcode: PICUP
Guest Presenters: Michele McColgan, Siena College and Duncan Carlsmith, UW Madison

The meeting will start with short presentations, and then we'll have time for questions and discussion in a colloquial setting. The presenters use MATLAB in their courses, and this meeting will provide a good opportunity to see the functionality that MATLAB affords. However, the presenters' approach to integrating computation is relevant generally; thus, this meeting should be of great interest, even if you are not a MATLAB user.

PICUP Back-to-School Webinar: Tools of the Trade

Wednesday, August 12th at 7 PM EDT / 6 PM CDT / 5 PM MDT / 4 PM PDT

Join us for a special back-to-school PICUP webinar where we'll briefly explore a number of free tools that are available to help you deliver computational activities in your physics courses:  Jupyter Notebooks (local and in the cloud), Spyder, Octave/Matlab, GlowScript/VPython, p5.js, and Excel/Google spreadsheets. After being introduced to these platforms, you'll be able to ask questions and schedule follow-up learning opportunities based on the platform(s) that interests you most.

NOTE: The webinar will be recorded and posted on the PICUP site for viewing for those who are unable to attend the meeting on Wednesday, August 12.

Link to join the Zoom meeting: https://ksu.zoom.us/j/94833674067

PICUP Virtual Conference

This conference featured 18 presentations and 5 panel discussions that provided you with tips, tricks, and best practices to help you teach physics online!

Dates: Friday, June 26 and Wednesday, July 1, 2020
Location: On your computer!

PICUP Spring Webinar Series: Online Trajectories

Thursday, May 21 @ 7pm ET | 6pm CT | 5pm MT | 4pm PT

Featured Presenters:  Rebecca Vieyra, Ruth Chabay, Bruce Sherwood, and Ariel Paul.

Now that we've survived the half-online semester of spring 2020, we can start to make more proactive plans for modified delivery in fall 2020. Whether we're planning to teach online, meet with students six feet apart, or evaluate our options for teaching with social distancing, there's a lot we can learn from each other to deliver the best physics experience to our students. Come hear from colleagues and developers who have plenty to share about new approaches to our classes, and specifically about teaching computation on-line.

PICUP Spring Webinar Series: Failure Modes for Online Physics

Wednesday, April 29, 2020 at 8pm EDT | 7pm CDT | 6pm MDT | 5pm PDT

In our rushed move to teaching physics online, it was probably inevitable that some things were going to go wrong. Now that we have been at it for a while, we are all starting to see just how something we had hoped would help our students may have instead confused them, or things that we had hoped would simplify the logistics of teaching virtually have actually made them more complex. In homage to the engineers, we're searching for failure modes in our online teaching. Join us for a few examples of where, how, and why a topic, a homework, or a lab hasn't worked out the way we envisioned and what we've learned from these stumbles.

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