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written by John J. Clement and David Brown
This presents examples of the role of analogical reasoning in expert problem solving. These are intended to show that using an analogy can change an expert's understanding of a problem situation by changing the conceptual model he or she uses to think about the situation. This suggests that using a good analogy may allow students to overcome a deep misconception by helping them to change the conceptual model they use to think about a physical phenomenon. This pilot study presents evidence from a tutoring interview showing that the use of analogies can help in overcoming misconceptions. The main strategies employed to effect conceptual change (taken from strategies observed in expert protocols) were the use of analogies and specific techniques for confirming these analogies. It is suggested that analysis of such tutoring interviews could lead to a cognitive model for how deep misconceptions may be changed during learning. Potential classroom applications are considered briefly. Several figures are provided.
Subjects Levels Resource Types
Education - Applied Research
- Active Learning
= Problem Solving
- Pedagogy
= Analogies
Education - Basic Research
- Learning Theory
- Lower Undergraduate
- Graduate/Professional
- Reference Material
= Research study
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Format:
non-digital
Mirror:
http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED286745
Access Rights:
Free access
Restriction:
© 1984 John Clement, David Brown
Keywords:
Analogical Reasoning, Cognitive Structures, College Science, Concept Formation, Higher Education, Learning Processes, Misconceptions, Models, Physics, Science Education, Science Instruction, Scientific Concepts, Secondary Education, Secondary School Science
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created September 27, 2006 by Lyle Barbato
Record Updated:
August 12, 2013 by Lyle Barbato
Last Update
when Cataloged:
May 18, 1984
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Record Link
AIP Format
J. Clement and D. Brown, , 1984, WWW Document, (http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED286745.pdf).
AJP/PRST-PER
J. Clement and D. Brown, Using Analogical Reasoning to Deal with 'Deep' Misconceptions in Physics, , 1984, <http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED286745.pdf>.
APA Format
Clement, J., & Brown, D. (1984). Using Analogical Reasoning to Deal with 'Deep' Misconceptions in Physics. Retrieved October 16, 2019, from http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED286745.pdf
Chicago Format
Clement, John, and David Brown. "Using Analogical Reasoning to Deal with 'Deep' Misconceptions in Physics." 20. 1984. http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED286745.pdf (accessed 16 October 2019).
MLA Format
Clement, John, and David Brown. Using Analogical Reasoning to Deal with 'Deep' Misconceptions in Physics. 1984. 16 Oct. 2019 <http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED286745.pdf>.
BibTeX Export Format
@techreport{ Author = "John Clement and David Brown", Title = {Using Analogical Reasoning to Deal with 'Deep' Misconceptions in Physics}, Month = {May}, Year = {1984} }
Refer Export Format

%A John Clement
%A David Brown
%T Using Analogical Reasoning to Deal with 'Deep' Misconceptions in Physics
%D May 18, 1984
%P 20
%U http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED286745.pdf
%O non-digital

EndNote Export Format

%0 Report
%A Clement, John
%A Brown, David
%D May 18, 1984
%T Using Analogical Reasoning to Deal with 'Deep' Misconceptions in Physics
%P 20
%8 May 18, 1984
%U http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED286745.pdf


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