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written by Anne-Barrie Hunter, Sandra L. Laursen, and Elaine Seymour
edited by Roman Taraban and Richard L. Blanton
Findings from our study of undergraduate research (UR) demonstrate the multi-faceted benefits students take away from research experience in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields and support many of faculty research advisors' anecdotal claims for UR. Following a dearth of empirically based research on the outcomes of UR programs, it is gratifying to have data from several recent studies that have begun to establish the nature and extent of the many benefits long claimed for UR experiences. This chapter presents findings from our comparative analysis of faculty and student perceptions of the benefits of participating in UR in the sciences and illustrates the sometimes different ways in which faculty and their students view particular areas of gain and their significance. Results from the comparative analysis show that the faculty advisors' observations largely match those of their students. As we will discuss, important distinctions emerged in the analysis in the ways in which each group perceives and values particular types of gains. Students emphasized the personal-professional transitions they experience as gains from UR. They reported shifts in their attitudes, practices, and levels of engagement as learners and apprentice researchers, and increased awareness of their temperamental aptitude for the risks and reversals inherent in authentic research. They defined these gains as having both personal and professional significance and regarded many of them as transferable to other areas of life. Faculty advisors agreed (to a greater or lesser extent) with their students' reports of the types and personal significance of their gains, but faculty also framed particular gains as evidence of their students' development as young professionals. Faculty advisors' added perspective on students' professional socialization suggests essential first steps in students' becoming scientists.
Book Title: Creating Effective Undergraduate Research Programs in Science
Pages 135-171, Ch. 7
Subjects Levels Resource Types
Education - Basic Research
- Sample Population
= Instructor: Faculty
- Student Characteristics
= Affect
- Teacher Characteristics
= Affect
- Upper Undergraduate
- Lower Undergraduate
- Reference Material
= Article
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Format:
non-digital
Access Rights:
Limited free access and
Available for purchase
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© 2008 Teachers College, Columbia University
ISBN Number:
9780807748770
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created November 14, 2015 by Sarah Keffer
Record Updated:
June 15, 2017 by Bruce Mason
Last Update
when Cataloged:
June 20, 2008
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Record Link
AIP Format
A. Hunter, S. Laursen, and E. Seymour, in Creating Effective Undergraduate Research Programs in Science, edited by R. Taraban and R. Blanton, (2008), pp. 135, WWW Document, (https://www.amazon.com/Creating-Effective-Undergraduate-Research-Programs/dp/0807748773).
AJP/PRST-PER
A. Hunter, S. Laursen, and E. Seymour, Benefits of Participating in Undergraduate Research in Science: Comparing Faculty and Student Perceptions, in Creating Effective Undergraduate Research Programs in Science, edited by R. Taraban and R. Blanton, (2008), pp. 135, <https://www.amazon.com/Creating-Effective-Undergraduate-Research-Programs/dp/0807748773>.
APA Format
Hunter, A., Laursen, S., & Seymour, E. (2008). Benefits of Participating in Undergraduate Research in Science: Comparing Faculty and Student Perceptions. In Taraban, R., & Blanton, R. (Eds.), Creating Effective Undergraduate Research Programs in Science (1, 135). Retrieved November 20, 2019, from https://www.amazon.com/Creating-Effective-Undergraduate-Research-Programs/dp/0807748773
Chicago Format
Hunter, A, S. Laursen, and E. Seymour. "Benefits of Participating in Undergraduate Research in Science: Comparing Faculty and Student Perceptions." In Creating Effective Undergraduate Research Programs in Science. 1 ed. Edited by Roman Taraban, and Richard Blanton, 135. 2008. https://www.amazon.com/Creating-Effective-Undergraduate-Research-Programs/dp/0807748773 (accessed 20 November 2019).
MLA Format
Hunter, Anne-Barrie, Sandra Laursen, and Elaine Seymour. "Benefits of Participating in Undergraduate Research in Science: Comparing Faculty and Student Perceptions." Creating Effective Undergraduate Research Programs in Science. Eds. Taraban, Roman, and Richard Blanton. 1 ed. 2008. 135-171, Ch. 7. 20 June 2008. 20 Nov. 2019 <https://www.amazon.com/Creating-Effective-Undergraduate-Research-Programs/dp/0807748773>.
BibTeX Export Format
@incollection{ Author = "Anne-Barrie Hunter and Sandra Laursen and Elaine Seymour", Editor = "Roman Taraban and Richard Blanton", Title = {Benefits of Participating in Undergraduate Research in Science: Comparing Faculty and Student Perceptions}, BookTitle = {Creating Effective Undergraduate Research Programs in Science}, Edition = {1}, Pages = {135-171, Ch. 7}, Month = {June}, Year = {2008} }
Refer Export Format

%A Anne-Barrie Hunter
%A Sandra Laursen
%A Elaine Seymour
%T Benefits of Participating in Undergraduate Research in Science: Comparing Faculty and Student Perceptions
%B Creating Effective Undergraduate Research Programs in Science
%E Roman Taraban
%E Richard Blanton, (eds)
%D June 20, 2008
%P 135-171, Ch. 7
%U https://www.amazon.com/Creating-Effective-Undergraduate-Research-Programs/dp/0807748773
%O 1
%O non-digital

EndNote Export Format

%0 Book Section
%A Hunter, Anne-Barrie
%A Laursen, Sandra
%A Seymour, Elaine
%D June 20, 2008
%T Benefits of Participating in Undergraduate Research in Science: Comparing Faculty and Student Perceptions
%E Taraban, Roman
%E Blanton, Richard
%B Creating Effective Undergraduate Research Programs in Science
%P 135-171, Ch. 7
%7 1
%8 June 20, 2008
%@ 9780807748770
%U https://www.amazon.com/Creating-Effective-Undergraduate-Research-Programs/dp/0807748773


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