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American Journal of Physics
written by Shelley Yeo, Robert Loss, Marjan Zadnik, A. Harrison, and David Treagust
Interactive multimedia is promoted as an effective and stimulating medium for learning science, but students do not always interact with multimedia as intended by the designers. We discuss students' interactions with an interactive multimedia program segment about projectile motion in the context of long jumping. Qualitative data were collected using a video camera and split-screen recorder to record each student's image, voice, and student–program interactions. Left to themselves, students' interactions were superficial, but when asked to explain their observations of projectile motion illustrations, they were observed to retain common intuitive conceptions. Only following researcher intervention did students develop an awareness of abstract aspects of the program. These results suggest that, despite interactivity and animated graphics, interactive multimedia may not produce the desired outcome for students learning introductory physics concepts.
American Journal of Physics: Volume 72, Issue 10, Pages 1351 - 1358
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© 2004 American Association of Physics Teachers
Keywords:
animation, graphics, simulation
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created June 25, 2007 by Shawn Weatherford
Record Updated:
May 28, 2019 by Bruce Mason
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when Cataloged:
September 13, 2004
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AIP Format
S. Yeo, R. Loss, M. Zadnik, A. Harrison, and D. Treagust, Am. J. Phys. 72 (10), 1351 (2004), WWW Document, (http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.1748074).
AJP/PRST-PER
S. Yeo, R. Loss, M. Zadnik, A. Harrison, and D. Treagust, What do students really learn from interactive multimedia? A physics case study, Am. J. Phys. 72 (10), 1351 (2004), <http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.1748074>.
APA Format
Yeo, S., Loss, R., Zadnik, M., Harrison, A., & Treagust, D. (2004, September 13). What do students really learn from interactive multimedia? A physics case study. Am. J. Phys., 72(10), 1351 - 1358. Retrieved November 22, 2019, from http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.1748074
Chicago Format
Yeo, S, R. Loss, M. Zadnik, A. Harrison, and D. Treagust. "What do students really learn from interactive multimedia? A physics case study." Am. J. Phys. 72, no. 10, (September 13, 2004): 1351 - 1358, http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.1748074 (accessed 22 November 2019).
MLA Format
Yeo, Shelley, Robert Loss, Marjan Zadnik, A. Harrison, and David Treagust. "What do students really learn from interactive multimedia? A physics case study." Am. J. Phys. 72.10 (2004): 1351 - 1358. 22 Nov. 2019 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.1748074>.
BibTeX Export Format
@article{ Author = "Shelley Yeo and Robert Loss and Marjan Zadnik and A. Harrison and David Treagust", Title = {What do students really learn from interactive multimedia? A physics case study}, Journal = {Am. J. Phys.}, Volume = {72}, Number = {10}, Pages = {1351 - 1358}, Month = {September}, Year = {2004} }
Refer Export Format

%A Shelley Yeo
%A Robert Loss
%A Marjan Zadnik
%A A. Harrison
%A David Treagust
%T What do students really learn from interactive multimedia? A physics case study
%J Am. J. Phys.
%V 72
%N 10
%D September 13, 2004
%P 1351 - 1358
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.1748074
%O application/pdf

EndNote Export Format

%0 Journal Article
%A Yeo, Shelley
%A Loss, Robert
%A Zadnik, Marjan
%A Harrison, A.
%A Treagust, David
%D September 13, 2004
%T What do students really learn from interactive multimedia? A physics case study
%J Am. J. Phys.
%V 72
%N 10
%P 1351 - 1358
%8 September 13, 2004
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.1748074


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