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written by Kimberly Scott and Mary Aleta White
This article investigates the motivations of African American and Latino girls ages 13-18) who navigate urban Southwest school districts during the day, but voluntarily attend a 2-year, culturally responsive multimedia program after school and into the summer. Understanding that girls from economically disadvantaged settings are indeed motivated to become technological innovators but often do not have access to the necessary resources to follow their interest, our program--entitled COMPUGIRLS--assumes a culturally responsive computing approach. This research examines particular features of the program  that attracted and retained the Latina (74%) and African American (19%) adolescent participants as well as to what extent the culturally relevant aspects of the curriculum assist with program retention and/or affect the students' vision of themselves as a future technologist. An evaluative approach gathered 2 years of data from the participants. Field notes from observations and interviews were transcribed and reviewed to extract themes and areas of convergence. Two primary themes emerged from the data to explain girls' sustained motivation. The first was the challenge of learning and mastering the technology. For many, this also included disproving the stereotypes of their abilities by age, gender, and race. The second theme was being able to manipulate technology and learning experiences as a means of self-expression and research, particularly if the results could be used to inform their community and peers. The authors posit that much of the program impact was because of the culturally responsive practices (asset building, reflection, and connectedness) embedded within the curriculum. Implications for urban educators and program developers are considered.
Urban Education: Volume 48, Issue 5, Pages 657-681
Subjects Levels Resource Types
Education - Applied Research
- Informal Education
- Learning Environment
Education - Basic Research
- Cognition
= Cognition Development
- Sample Population
= Background: Language
= Ethnicity or Race
= Gender
- Societal Issues
= Cultural Issues
= Gender Issues
= Race Issues
- Student Characteristics
= Affect
= Skills
Other Sciences
- Computer Science
- High School
- Middle School
- Reference Material
= Research study
PER-Central Types Intended Users Ratings
- Curriculum
- Curriculum / Research Instrument
- Researchers
- Administrators
- Educators
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© 2013 Sage Publishing
DOI:
10.1177/0042085913491219
NSF Numbers:
DRL
0833773
Keywords:
ARC, CRE, Culturally Relevant Education, Culturally Responsive Computing, achievement, equity in education, inclusivity, justice education, motivation theory
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created November 25, 2021 by Sam McKagan
Record Updated:
December 11, 2021 by Caroline Hall
Last Update
when Cataloged:
September 12, 2013
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Record Link
AIP Format
K. Scott and M. Aleta White, Urban Educ. 48 (5), 657 (2013), WWW Document, (https://doi.org/10.1177/0042085913491219).
AJP/PRST-PER
K. Scott and M. Aleta White, COMPUGIRLS’ Standpoint: Culturally Responsive Computing and Its Effect on Girls of Color, Urban Educ. 48 (5), 657 (2013), <https://doi.org/10.1177/0042085913491219>.
APA Format
Scott, K., & Aleta White, M. (2013, September 12). COMPUGIRLS’ Standpoint: Culturally Responsive Computing and Its Effect on Girls of Color. Urban Educ., 48(5), 657-681. Retrieved May 22, 2022, from https://doi.org/10.1177/0042085913491219
Chicago Format
Scott, Kimberly, and Mary Aleta White. "COMPUGIRLS’ Standpoint: Culturally Responsive Computing and Its Effect on Girls of Color." Urban Educ. 48, no. 5, (September 12, 2013): 657-681, https://doi.org/10.1177/0042085913491219 (accessed 22 May 2022).
MLA Format
Scott, Kimberly, and Mary Aleta White. "COMPUGIRLS’ Standpoint: Culturally Responsive Computing and Its Effect on Girls of Color." Urban Educ. 48.5 (2013): 657-681. 22 May 2022 <https://doi.org/10.1177/0042085913491219>.
BibTeX Export Format
@article{ Author = "Kimberly Scott and Mary Aleta White", Title = {COMPUGIRLS’ Standpoint: Culturally Responsive Computing and Its Effect on Girls of Color}, Journal = {Urban Educ.}, Volume = {48}, Number = {5}, Pages = {657-681}, Month = {September}, Year = {2013} }
Refer Export Format

%A Kimberly Scott %A Mary Aleta White %T COMPUGIRLS' Standpoint: Culturally Responsive Computing and Its Effect on Girls of Color %J Urban Educ. %V 48 %N 5 %D September 12, 2013 %P 657-681 %U https://doi.org/10.1177/0042085913491219 %O text/html

EndNote Export Format

%0 Journal Article %A Scott, Kimberly %A Aleta White, Mary %D September 12, 2013 %T COMPUGIRLS' Standpoint: Culturally Responsive Computing and Its Effect on Girls of Color %J Urban Educ. %V 48 %N 5 %P 657-681 %8 September 12, 2013 %U https://doi.org/10.1177/0042085913491219


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