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Nanoflower Bouquet - Jul 20, 2006 at 9:59PM
Anna
Virginia Tech, Bla...
8 Posts

Here is the original image:

http://www.nature.com/embor/journal/v5/n1s/images/7400223-i2.jpg

But I sort of like the bright blue version of this one better:

http://www.ambascience.co.uk/IMG/jpg/Nanoflower_230x230-2.jpg

At any rate, it's the same picture. The image is of a nanoflower bouquet, which is actually a complex structure of silicon carbide nanowires grown from a vapor phase. The morphology of this thing can be precisely controlled by varying the growth conditions, which can result in all kinds of neat configurations. These particular structures were created at the Nanoscience Center at the University of Cambridge,  UK, and the image was published in EMBO reports and can be found on www.nature.com.

I, personally, think this is absolutely amazing. The picture is incredibly beautiful, and it's just so striking that some tiny network of nanowires can create something that looks like a bouquet of flowers. People don't usually think of flowers as a "collection of tiny particles" or anything of the sort, and find that they are just aesthetically pleasing because they're in front of you and they're pretty. Whereas with this picture, you're looking at something that resembles a flower, but it's beautiful and captivating not only because it's a flower and it's pretty, but also because as a scientist, you become instantly fascinated with what this thing actually is and how it was created, and then come full circle to the realization that, "hey, it's kind of like a flower, and it's really pretty."

This is actually probably one of the coolest and most memorable pictures I've ever seen.

Anna Belak
Dept. of Physics
Virginia Tech


Replies to Nanoflower Bouquet

Re: Nanoflower Bouquet - Jul 28 2006 8:35AM
Gary
Society of Physics...
293 Posts

great picture Anna!


> Re: Nanoflower Bouquet
>
> Here is the original image:

http://www.nature.com/embor/journal/v5/n1s/images/7400223-i2.jpg

But
> I sort of like the bright blue version of this one
> better:

http://www.ambascience.co.uk/IMG/jpg/Nanoflower_230x230-2.jpg

At
> any rate, it's the same picture. The image is of a
> nanoflower bouquet, which is actually a complex structure
> of silicon carbide nanowires grown from a vapor phase.
> The morphology of this thing can be precisely controlled
> by varying the growth conditions, which can result
> in all kinds of neat configurations. These particular
> structures were created at the Nanoscience Center
> at the University of Cambridge,  UK, and the
> image was published in EMBO reports and can be found
> on www.nature.com.

I, personally, think this
> is absolutely amazing. The picture is incredibly beautiful,
> and it's just so striking that some tiny network of
> nanowires can create something that looks like a bouquet
> of flowers. People don't usually think of flowers
> as a "collection of tiny particles" or anything of
> the sort, and find that they are just aesthetically
> pleasing because they're in front of you and they're
> pretty. Whereas with this picture, you're looking
> at something that resembles a flower, but it's beautiful
> and captivating not only because it's a flower and
> it's pretty, but also because as a scientist, you
> become instantly fascinated with what this thing actually
> is and how it was created, and then come full circle
> to the realization that, "hey, it's kind of like a
> flower, and it's really pretty."

This is actually
> probably one of the coolest and most memorable pictures
> I've ever seen.

Anna Belak
Dept. of Physics
Virginia
> Tech


NSF Program Director (on assignment from the AIP and the Society of Physics Students to serve as the Robert Noyce Scholarship Program Director at the National Science Foundation)


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