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published by the National Center for Education Statistics
This cost-free web page allows teachers and learners to easily create and print graphs for use as visual communication tools.  Choose from five graph types: bar, line, area, pie, and X/Y.  Various patterns, colors, grids, and label choices are available to allow customization.  A detailed tutorial explains which graphical representation is best for various types of applications and assists users in set-up.  This resource was created by the National Center for Education Statistics.

Please note that this resource requires Flash.
Editor's Note: Know what we like best about this resource? Its sponsor, the National Center for Educational Statistics, has maintained it as a cost-free and ad-free venue. Graphing requires mental concentration, which is hard to accomplish with constant distracting pop-ups.
Subjects Levels Resource Types
Classical Mechanics
- Motion in One Dimension
- Motion in Two Dimensions
- Work and Energy
= Conservation of Energy
Education Practices
- Active Learning
= Modeling
- Technology
= Multimedia
General Physics
- Measurement/Units
Other Sciences
- Mathematics
- High School
- Middle School
- Elementary School
- Lower Undergraduate
- Instructional Material
= Activity
= Best practice
= Tutorial
- Audio/Visual
= Graph
Appropriate Courses Categories Ratings
- Physical Science
- Physics First
- Conceptual Physics
- Algebra-based Physics
- AP Physics
- Activity
- New teachers
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Intended Users:
Educator
Learner
Administrator
Format:
application/flash
Access Rights:
Free access
Restriction:
Does not have a copyright, license, or other use restriction.
Additional information is available.
Keywords:
bar graph, coordinate graphing, graphs, line graph, modeling instruction, pie chart
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created November 29, 2007 by Caroline Hall
Record Updated:
March 29, 2014 by Caroline Hall
Last Update
when Cataloged:
November 1, 2007

AAAS Benchmark Alignments (2008 Version)

2. The Nature of Mathematics

2A. Patterns and Relationships
  • 3-5: 2A/E2. Mathematical ideas can be represented concretely, graphically, or symbolically.

9. The Mathematical World

9B. Symbolic Relationships
  • 3-5: 9B/E2. Tables and graphs can show how values of one quantity are related to values of another.
  • 6-8: 9B/M3. Graphs can show a variety of possible relationships between two variables. As one variable increases uniformly, the other may do one of the following: increase or decrease steadily, increase or decrease faster and faster, get closer and closer to some limiting value, reach some intermediate maximum or minimum, alternately increase and decrease, increase or decrease in steps, or do something different from any of these.
  • 9-12: 9B/H4. Tables, graphs, and symbols are alternative ways of representing data and relationships that can be translated from one to another.
9C. Shapes
  • 3-5: 9C/E3. Graphical display of quantities may make it possible to spot patterns that are not otherwise obvious, such as cycles and trends.
  • 6-8: 9C/M4. The graphic display of numbers may help to show patterns such as trends, varying rates of change, gaps, or clusters that are useful when making predictions about the phenomena being graphed.

Next Generation Science Standards

Crosscutting Concepts (K-12)

Patterns (K-12)
  • Graphs and charts can be used to identify patterns in data. (6-8)

Science and Engineering Practices (K-12)

Analyzing and Interpreting Data (K-12)
  • Analyzing data in 3–5 builds on K–2 experiences and progresses to introducing quantitative approaches to collecting data and conducting multiple trials of qualitative observations. When possible and feasible, digital tools should be used. (3-5)
    • Represent data in tables and various graphical displays (bar graphs and pictographs) to reveal patterns that indicate relationships. (3)
    • Represent data in graphical displays (bar graphs, pictographs and/or pie charts) to reveal patterns that indicate relationships. (5)
  • Analyzing data in 6–8 builds on K–5 and progresses to extending quantitative analysis to investigations, distinguishing between correlation and causation, and basic statistical techniques of data and error analysis. (6-8)
    • Construct and interpret graphical displays of data to identify linear and nonlinear relationships. (6-8)
Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking (5-12)
  • Mathematical and computational thinking in 3–5 builds on K–2 experiences and progresses to extending quantitative measurements to a variety of physical properties and using computation and mathematics to analyze data and compare alternative design solutions. (5)
    • Measure and graph quantities such as weight to address scientific and engineering questions and problems. (5)

Common Core State Standards for Mathematics Alignments

Standards for Mathematical Practice (K-12)

MP.5 Use appropriate tools strategically.

Measurement and Data (K-5)

Represent and interpret data. (1-5)
  • 2.MD.10 Draw a picture graph and a bar graph (with single-unit scale) to represent a data set with up to four categories. Solve simple put-together, take-apart, and compare problems using information presented in a bar graph.
  • 3.MD.3 Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories. Solve one- and two-step "how many more" and "how many less" problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs.
  • 4.MD.4 Make a line plot to display a data set of measurements in fractions of a unit (1/2, 1/4, 1/8). Solve problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions by using information presented in line plots.

Geometry (K-8)

Graph points on the coordinate plane to solve real-world and mathematical problems. (5)
  • 5.G.1 Use a pair of perpendicular number lines, called axes, to define a coordinate system, with the intersection of the lines (the origin) arranged to coincide with the 0 on each line and a given point in the plane located by using an ordered pair of numbers, called its coordinates. Understand that the first number indicates how far to travel from the origin in the direction of one axis, and the second number indicates how far to travel in the direction of the second axis, with the convention that the names of the two axes and the coordinates correspond (e.g., x-axis and x-coordinate, y-axis and y-coordinate).
  • 5.G.2 Represent real world and mathematical problems by graphing points in the first quadrant of the coordinate plane, and interpret coordinate values of points in the context of the situation.

This resource is part of 5 Physics Front Topical Units.


Topic: Measurement and the Language of Physics
Unit Title: Applying Measurement in Physics

This cost-free web page allows teachers and learners to easily create and print graphs for use as visual communication tools.  With one click, the students may choose from five graph types: bar, line, area, pie, and X/Y.  Various patterns, colors, grids, and label choices are available to allow customization.

Link to Unit:

Topic: Measurement and the Language of Physics
Unit Title: Teaching Tools

This cost-free web page allows teachers and learners to easily create and print graphs for use as visual communication tools.  With one click, the students may choose from five graph types: bar, line, area, pie, and X/Y.  Various patterns, colors, grids, and label choices are available to allow customization.

Link to Unit:

Topic: Kinematics: The Physics of Motion
Unit Title: Graphing

With one mouse click, students may create their own customized graphs from among five types: bar, line, area, pie, and X/Y.  Various patterns, colors, grids, and label choices allow for customization, with a full tutorial to help in set-up. This resource is cost-free.

Link to Unit:

Topic: Conservation of Energy
Unit Title: Teaching About Energy

One of the best ways for students to visualize Conservation of Energy is to create an energy pie chart or bar graph.  This cost-free web page allows them to select from one of five graph types:  bar, pie, line, area, or X/Y.  They can customize the patterns, colors, grids, and label choices, then print the final product. Editor's Note: Try letting students create their own energy graphs after exploring the Pendulum Energy Model (above).

Link to Unit:

Topic: Conservation of Energy
Unit Title: Conservation of Energy

One of the best ways for students to visualize Conservation of Energy is to create an energy pie chart or bar graph.  This cost-free web page allows them to select from one of five graph types:  bar, pie, line, area, or X/Y.  They can customize the patterns, colors, grids, and label choices, then print the final product.

Link to Unit:
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Record Link
AIP Format
(National Center for Education Statistics, Washington, 2006), WWW Document, (http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/createagraph/default.aspx).
AJP/PRST-PER
Create a Graph (National Center for Education Statistics, Washington, 2006), <http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/createagraph/default.aspx>.
APA Format
Create a Graph. (2007, November 1). Retrieved April 20, 2014, from National Center for Education Statistics: http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/createagraph/default.aspx
Chicago Format
National Center for Education Statistics. Create a Graph. Washington: National Center for Education Statistics, November 1, 2007. http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/createagraph/default.aspx (accessed 20 April 2014).
MLA Format
Create a Graph. Washington: National Center for Education Statistics, 2006. 1 Nov. 2007. 20 Apr. 2014 <http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/createagraph/default.aspx>.
BibTeX Export Format
@misc{ Title = {Create a Graph}, Publisher = {National Center for Education Statistics}, Volume = {2014}, Number = {20 April 2014}, Month = {November 1, 2007}, Year = {2006} }
Refer Export Format

%T Create a Graph
%D November 1, 2007
%I National Center for Education Statistics
%C Washington
%U http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/createagraph/default.aspx
%O application/flash

EndNote Export Format

%0 Electronic Source
%D November 1, 2007
%T Create a Graph
%I National Center for Education Statistics
%V 2014
%N 20 April 2014
%8 November 1, 2007
%9 application/flash
%U http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/createagraph/default.aspx


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The AIP Style presented is based on information from the AIP Style Manual.

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Jan 23 - Mar 23, 2013