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In this investigation for upper elementary, children explore how and why heat is produced from things that give off light, from machines, and from friction. At these grade levels, students are not expected to develop formal concepts of energy, but they can investigate how heat spreads from one place to another and what can be done to contain heat or shield objects from it. This lesson was crafted to lay a foundation for understanding energy transfer. It is completely turn-key, with printable worksheets, data table, warm-up and reflection questions, and background information.

This item is part of a larger collection of lessons compiled and edited by the AAAS (American Association for the Advancement of Science).
Subjects Levels Resource Types
Classical Mechanics
- Work and Energy
Education Practices
- Active Learning
= Inquiry Learning
Electricity & Magnetism
- Electromagnetic Radiation
= Electromagnetic Spectrum
Thermo & Stat Mech
- First Law
= Heat Transfer
- Elementary School
- Informal Education
- Instructional Material
= Activity
= Instructor Guide/Manual
= Laboratory
- Assessment Material
Appropriate Courses Categories Ratings
- Physical Science
- Lesson Plan
- Laboratory
- Assessment
- New teachers
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© 2010 American Association for the Advancement of Science
Keywords:
elementary energy lesson, energy transfer, friction, heat and temperature, heat transfer, light energy, radiant energy
Record Cloner:
Metadata instance created April 5, 2013 by Caroline Hall
Record Updated:
April 5, 2013 by Caroline Hall

AAAS Benchmark Alignments (2008 Version)

1. The Nature of Science

1A. The Scientific Worldview
  • 3-5: 1A/E2. Science is a process of trying to figure out how the world works by making careful observations and trying to make sense of those observations.
1B. Scientific Inquiry
  • 3-5: 1B/E1. Scientific investigations may take many different forms, including observing what things are like or what is happening somewhere, collecting specimens for analysis, and doing experiments.
  • 3-5: 1B/E2b. One reason for following directions carefully and for keeping records of one's work is to provide information on what might have caused differences in investigations.
1C. The Scientific Enterprise
  • 3-5: 1C/E1. Science is an adventure that people everywhere can take part in, as they have for many centuries.

4. The Physical Setting

4E. Energy Transformations
  • 3-5: 4E/E2c. A warmer object can warm a cooler one by contact or at a distance.
4F. Motion
  • 3-5: 4F/E3. Light travels and tends to maintain its direction of motion until it interacts with an object or material. Light can be absorbed, redirected, bounced back, or allowed to pass through.

11. Common Themes

11C. Constancy and Change
  • 3-5: 11C/E2b. Often the best way to tell which kinds of change are happening is to make a table or graph of measurements.

12. Habits of Mind

12A. Values and Attitudes
  • 3-5: 12A/E2. Offer reasons for claims and consider reasons suggested by others.
12D. Communication Skills
  • 3-5: 12D/E3. Use numerical data in describing and comparing objects and events.
  • 3-5: 12D/E4. Read simple tables and graphs produced by others and describe what the tables and graphs show.
  • 3-5: 12D/E7. Write a clear and accurate description of a real-world object or event.

NSES Content Standards

Con.A: Science as Inquiry
  • K-4: Understandings about Scientific Inquiry
Con.B: Physical Science
  • K-4: Properties of Objects & Materials

This resource is part of a Physics Front Topical Unit.


Topic: Conservation of Energy
Unit Title: Teaching Energy in the Elementary Grades

This lesson lays a foundation for kids to understand energy transfer as they explore how and why heat is produced from things that give off light, from machines, and from friction. At these grade levels, students are not expected to develop formal concepts of energy, but they can investigate how heat spreads from one place to another.  Completely turn-key.

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AIP Format
(American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC, 2010), WWW Document, (http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/when-things-start-heating-up/).
AJP/PRST-PER
ScienceNetLinks: When Things Start Heating Up (American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC, 2010), <http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/when-things-start-heating-up/>.
APA Format
ScienceNetLinks: When Things Start Heating Up. (2010). Retrieved August 31, 2014, from American Association for the Advancement of Science: http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/when-things-start-heating-up/
Chicago Format
American Association for the Advancement of Science. ScienceNetLinks: When Things Start Heating Up. Washington, DC: American Association for the Advancement of Science, 2010. http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/when-things-start-heating-up/ (accessed 31 August 2014).
MLA Format
ScienceNetLinks: When Things Start Heating Up. Washington, DC: American Association for the Advancement of Science, 2010. 31 Aug. 2014 <http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/when-things-start-heating-up/>.
BibTeX Export Format
@misc{ Title = {ScienceNetLinks: When Things Start Heating Up}, Publisher = {American Association for the Advancement of Science}, Volume = {2014}, Number = {31 August 2014}, Year = {2010} }
Refer Export Format

%T ScienceNetLinks: When Things Start Heating Up
%D 2010
%I American Association for the Advancement of Science
%C Washington, DC
%U http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/when-things-start-heating-up/
%O application/pdf

EndNote Export Format

%0 Electronic Source
%D 2010
%T ScienceNetLinks: When Things Start Heating Up
%I American Association for the Advancement of Science
%V 2014
%N 31 August 2014
%9 application/pdf
%U http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/when-things-start-heating-up/


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