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written by Andrew Duffy
This interactive simulation allows students to collide two objects and investigate whether momentum and/or kinetic energy are conserved in the collision process. To keep things simple, the simulation involves an isolated system where the objects collide along a single line. Use the sliders to set mass of both objects, initial velocity, and elasticity: then watch the resulting collision. Students then calculate post-collision values for momentum and kinetic energy for both balls.

SEE ANNOTATIONS for a link to an editor-recommended online tutorial on conservation of momentum, part of The Physics Classroom collection.  

Editor's Note: Lots of factors are at play, even in a simple collision. This resource will help your students build understanding the of following:  1) How to apply the law of momentum conservation, 2) Total energy in a closed system (it's always conserved, but in collisions, kinetic energy is generally transformed into other forms of energy), 3) In special cases (perfectly elastic collisions) the kinetic energy stays the same before and after a collision, 4) In completely inelastic collisions, objects stick together, 5) momentum is a vector.

This resource is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive.   In order to modify the simulation (and see how it is designed), users must install the Easy Java Simulations Modeling and Authoring Tool. SEE RELATED MATERIALS for a link to install the EJS modeling tool.

Please note that this resource requires at least version 1.5 of Java (JRE).
View the supplemental document attached to this resource
Subjects Levels Resource Types
Classical Mechanics
- Linear Momentum
= Collisions in One Dimension
= Conservation of Linear Momentum
- Work and Energy
= Conservation of Energy
- Lower Undergraduate
- Middle School
- High School
- Upper Undergraduate
- Instructional Material
= Curriculum support
= Interactive Simulation
Appropriate Courses Categories Ratings
- Physical Science
- Physics First
- Conceptual Physics
- Algebra-based Physics
- AP Physics
- Lesson Plan
- Activity
- Laboratory
- New teachers
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Intended Users:
Learner
Educator
Format:
application/java
Mirror:
http://physics.bu.edu/~duffy/Ejs/…
Access Rights:
Free access
License:
This material is released under a GNU General Public License Version 3 license.
Rights Holder:
Andrew Duffy, Boston University
Keywords:
collision, elasticity, energy, momentum, one dimension
Record Cloner:
Metadata instance created April 27, 2010 by Mario Belloni
Record Updated:
June 11, 2014 by Andreu Glasmann
Last Update
when Cataloged:
April 16, 2010
Other Collections:

The Physics Classroom: Law of Momentum Conservation (Editor: Caroline Hall)

This chapter of The Physics Classroom tutorial has six sections that offer in-depth support in understanding momentum conservation, especially in isolated systems. Students will review the Law of Action-Reaction, explore both impulse and collision, and interactively practice using related equations for problem-solving. Many practical examples are given, alongside diagrams, drawings, and animations.\

The Physics Classroom: The Law of Momentum Conservation (html)

This resource is part of a Physics Front Topical Unit.


Topic: Impulse and Momentum
Unit Title: Teaching about Impulse and Momentum

Lots of factors are at play in a simple collision. This resource will help your students build understanding the of following:  1) How to apply the law of momentum conservation, 2) Total energy in a closed system (it's always conserved, but in collisions, kinetic energy is generally transformed into other forms of energy), 3) In special cases (perfectly elastic collisions) the kinetic energy stays the same before and after a collision, 4) In completely inelastic collisions, objects stick together, 5) momentum is a vector.

Link to Unit:
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Record Link
AIP Format
A. Duffy, Computer Program ONE DIMENSIONAL COLLISION MODEL (2010), WWW Document, (http://www.compadre.org/Repository/document/ServeFile.cfm?ID=10000&DocID=1637).
AJP/PRST-PER
A. Duffy, Computer Program ONE DIMENSIONAL COLLISION MODEL (2010), <http://www.compadre.org/Repository/document/ServeFile.cfm?ID=10000&DocID=1637>.
APA Format
Duffy, A. (2010). One Dimensional Collision Model [Computer software]. Retrieved July 31, 2014, from http://www.compadre.org/Repository/document/ServeFile.cfm?ID=10000&DocID=1637
Chicago Format
Duffy, Andrew. "One Dimensional Collision Model." http://www.compadre.org/Repository/document/ServeFile.cfm?ID=10000&DocID=1637 (accessed 31 July 2014).
MLA Format
Duffy, Andrew. One Dimensional Collision Model. Computer software. 2010. Java (JRE) 1.5. 31 July 2014 <http://www.compadre.org/Repository/document/ServeFile.cfm?ID=10000&DocID=1637>.
BibTeX Export Format
@misc{ Author = "Andrew Duffy", Title = {One Dimensional Collision Model}, Month = {April}, Year = {2010} }
Refer Export Format

%A Andrew Duffy
%T One Dimensional Collision Model
%D April 16, 2010
%U http://www.compadre.org/Repository/document/ServeFile.cfm?ID=10000&DocID=1637
%O application/java

EndNote Export Format

%0 Computer Program
%A Duffy, Andrew
%D April 16, 2010
%T One Dimensional Collision Model
%8 April 16, 2010
%U http://www.compadre.org/Repository/document/ServeFile.cfm?ID=10000&DocID=1637


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One Dimensional Collision Model:

Is Based On Easy Java Simulations Modeling and Authoring Tool

The Easy Java Simulations Modeling and Authoring Tool is needed to explore the computational model used in the One Dimensional Collision Model.

relation by Mario Belloni
Covers the Same Topic As Two Particle Elastic Collision Model

This is a more advanced model of collision, in which the user may set up either a one-dimensional or two-dimensional elastic collision of two hard disks in an isolated system.

relation by Caroline Hall

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