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2008 PERC Proceedings

Conference Information

Dates: July 23-24, 2008
Location: Edmonton, CA
Theme: Physics Education Research with Diverse Student Populations

Proceedings Information

Editors: Charles Henderson, Mel Sabella, and Leon Hsu
Published: October 20, 2008
AIP URL: AIP Conference Proceedings 1064
Info: Single book; 266 pages; 8.5 X 11 inches, single column
ISBN: 978-0-7354-0594-3
ISSN (Print): 0094-243X
ISSN (Online): 1551-7616

The 2008 Physics Education Research Conference brought together researchers studying a wide variety of topics in physics education. The conference theme was "Physics Education Research with Diverse Student Populations". Researchers specializing in diversity issues were invited to help establish a dialog and spur discussion about how the results from this work can inform the physics education research community. The organizers encouraged physics education researchers who are using research-based instructional materials with non-traditional students at either the pre-college level or the college level to share their experiences as instructors and researchers in these classes.

Readership: Physics education researchers (faculty, post-doctoral students, and graduate/undergraduate students); researchers in fields close to Physics Education, such as cognitive science, chemistry education, biology education; physics faculty at undergraduate and graduate levels; high school physics teachers

Table of Contents

Front Matter
Invited Papers (14)
Peer-reviewed Papers (44)
Back Matter

INVITED MANUSCRIPTS (14)

First Author Index

Allie · Brahmia · Dey · Docktor · Finkelstein · Gutierrez · Johnson · Kelly · Loverude · Rand · Sabella · Scantlebury · Tobin · Yerushalmi

Invited Papers

Making Sense of Measurements, Making Sense of the Textbook
Saalih Allie, Dedra Demaree, Julian Taylor, Fred Lubben, and Andy Buffler
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 3-6, doi:10.1063/1.3021268
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Students who enroll for the special access course in physics at the University of Cape Town generally do not speak English as first language and have experienced poor science teaching. As a consequence students experience a large range of difficulties in trying to learn physics. We discuss research carried out in two such areas (a) understanding of measurement and (b) engagement with the textbook. With regard to (a) an overview of the methodology, analysis framework and findings of previous work will be presented together with more recent preliminary findings regarding audience dependence when conveying measurement results. With regard to (b) the idea of writing chapter summaries was used to guide students through the book with the aim that the textbook would come to be valued an accessible resource. Findings from the analysis of the student summaries are presented.

S. Allie, D. Demaree, J. Taylor, F. Lubben, and A. Buffler, Making Sense of Measurements, Making Sense of the Textbook, 2008 PERC Proceedings [Edmonton, CA, July 23-24, 2008], edited by C. Henderson, M. Sabella, and L. Hsu [AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, 3-6 (2008)], doi:10.1063/1.3021268.

Improving Learning for Underrepresented Groups in Physics for Engineering Majors
Suzanne Brahmia
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 7-10, doi:10.1063/1.3021279
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The Extended Analytical Physics course at Rutgers University was crafted to improve learning in the first-year physics course for students mathematically under-prepared for engineering physics. It is a core course in the engineering curriculum and has contributed to the increase in success of underrepresented groups in physics and in subsequently in STEM majors. This article describes the evolution of this course, its current structure, the successes measured and the future plans.

S. Brahmia, Improving Learning for Underrepresented Groups in Physics for Engineering Majors, 2008 PERC Proceedings [Edmonton, CA, July 23-24, 2008], edited by C. Henderson, M. Sabella, and L. Hsu [AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, 7-10 (2008)], doi:10.1063/1.3021279.

A Variety of Diversity: Facing Higher Education's Educational Challenges
Eric Dey
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 11-14, doi:10.1063/1.3021232
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First among the many important challenges facing American higher education is the need to improve the effectiveness of our educational programs. Public concern has heightened the sense of urgency for colleges and universities to make progress on improving and measuring educational outcomes, which is made more challenging by the varieties of diversity facing us. Diversity is not just an issue related to student recruitment or experience, but rather it is one that also relates to institutions and their faculties. New educational methods must address such diversity to be effective, and one possible example can be found in ongoing research at the University of Michigan that explores the educational implications of implementing a web-based lecture capture system in large lecture courses. Student use of and reactions to such systems is important, as is the potential to influence course performance for students in general, but also for underrepresented and at-risk student subpopulations. In addition to helping bring our current landscape into focus, the session will identify effective practices as well as continuing challenges to improving educational practice for undergraduate students.

E. Dey, A Variety of Diversity: Facing Higher Education's Educational Challenges, 2008 PERC Proceedings [Edmonton, CA, July 23-24, 2008], edited by C. Henderson, M. Sabella, and L. Hsu [AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, 11-14 (2008)], doi:10.1063/1.3021232.

Gender Differences in Both Force Concept Inventory and Introductory Physics Performance
Jennifer Docktor and Kenneth Heller
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 15-18, doi:10.1063/1.3021243
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We present data from a decade of introductory calculus-based physics courses for science and engineering students at the University of Minnesota taught using cooperative group problem solving. The data include 40 classes with more than 5500 students taught by 22 different professors. The average normalized gain for males is 0.4 for these large classes that emphasized problem solving. Female students made up approximately 20% of these classes. We present relationships between pre and post Force Concept Inventory (FCI) scores, course grades, and final exam scores for females and males. We compare our results with previous studies from Harvard [2] and the University of Colorado [3,4]. Our data show there is a significant gender gap in pre-test FCI scores that persists post-instruction although there is essentially no gender difference in course performance as determined by course grade.

J. Docktor and K. Heller, Gender Differences in Both Force Concept Inventory and Introductory Physics Performance, 2008 PERC Proceedings [Edmonton, CA, July 23-24, 2008], edited by C. Henderson, M. Sabella, and L. Hsu [AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, 15-18 (2008)], doi:10.1063/1.3021243.

Acting in Our Own Self-Interests: Blending University and Community in Informal Science Education
Noah D. Finkelstein and Laurel Mayhew
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 19-22, doi:10.1063/1.3021254
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Research in physics education has demonstrated new tools and models for improving the understanding and engagement of traditional college students [1]. Building on this base, the research community has bridged the gap from college to pre-college education, even elementary school [2]. However, little work has been done to engage students in out-of-school settings, particularly for those students from populations under-represented in the sciences. We present a theoretically-grounded model of university-community partnership [3] that engages university students and children in a collective enterprise that has the potential to improve the participation and education of all. We document the impact of these programs on: university participants who learn about education, the community and even some science; children in the community who learn about science, the nature of science and develop their identities and attitudes towards science; and, shifts in institutional practice which may allow these programs to be sustained, or not.

N. D. Finkelstein and L. Mayhew, Acting in Our Own Self-Interests: Blending University and Community in Informal Science Education, 2008 PERC Proceedings [Edmonton, CA, July 23-24, 2008], edited by C. Henderson, M. Sabella, and L. Hsu [AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, 19-22 (2008)], doi:10.1063/1.3021254.

What is “Nepantla” and How Can it Help Physics Education Researchers Conceptualize Knowledge for Teaching?
Rochelle Gutierrez
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 23-25, doi:10.1063/1.3021263
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This article draws on Latina/Latino studies to offer physics education a potential framework for reconceptualizing the “knowledge” teachers will need to engage marginalized students. Drawing on Gloria Anzaldúa's notion of Nepantla (a liminal space that facilitates transformation), I offer examples of teacher candidates as they come to recognize multiple realities in teaching mathematics to urban high school students. I suggest that as we prepare teachers, we must help them not only recognize a state of Nepantla (to see and participate in multiple realities) but also come to expect the uneasiness with being in that space as it offers potential for new knowledge.

R. Gutierrez, What is “Nepantla” and How Can it Help Physics Education Researchers Conceptualize Knowledge for Teaching?, 2008 PERC Proceedings [Edmonton, CA, July 23-24, 2008], edited by C. Henderson, M. Sabella, and L. Hsu [AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, 23-25 (2008)], doi:10.1063/1.3021263.

Similarities and Differences In Ideas Generated by Physics Learners: US College Students Vs. Tibetan Buddhist Monks
Andy Johnson
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 26-29, doi:10.1063/1.3021264
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We have used PER-based course materials to teach various physics topics to Tibetan Buddhist monks over the last four years. While listening to the monks' ideas through interpreters, we found some striking similarities with ideas that we hear in our own classrooms in the US. However, the degree of similarity of monks' ideas with those of US students varied with the topic. For example, ideas that emerged in the topic of magnetism were often consistent with western ideas while ideas about color addition were sometimes strikingly different from ideas that American students use. The monks' ways of talking lead us to believe that cultural background partially determines how they think initially about particular physics topics. This poster will give examples of similarities and of differences, and attempt to identify reasons for both.

A. Johnson, Similarities and Differences In Ideas Generated by Physics Learners: US College Students Vs. Tibetan Buddhist Monks, 2008 PERC Proceedings [Edmonton, CA, July 23-24, 2008], edited by C. Henderson, M. Sabella, and L. Hsu [AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, 26-29 (2008)], doi:10.1063/1.3021264.

Inequities in Physics Access and Enrollment in Urban High Schools
Angela Kelly
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 30-33, doi:10.1063/1.3021265
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Despite reports to the contrary, the availability of physics as a course for secondary students is not equitably distributed throughout the U.S. While some schools provide physics access for all, a more common scenario is limited availability to select students. This is particularly true in urban districts, where this study examined access to and availability of high school physics. New York City’s secondary schools were surveyed to determine where physics was offered and how many students were enrolled. Statistics were performed to compare differences between physics and non-physics schools. Additionally, organizational factors were examined that relate to physics availability, such as the magnet school configuration, the AP Physics and conceptual physics options, and science curricular sequence. Overall, it was determined that physics availability is limited in NYC schools, a serious inequity that disproportionately affects students of color and poor children. Strategies for improving access and enrollment will be discussed.

A. Kelly, Inequities in Physics Access and Enrollment in Urban High Schools, 2008 PERC Proceedings [Edmonton, CA, July 23-24, 2008], edited by C. Henderson, M. Sabella, and L. Hsu [AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, 30-33 (2008)], doi:10.1063/1.3021265.

Curriculum Design for the Algebra-Based Course: Just Change the ‘D’s to Deltas?
Michael E. Loverude, Stephen E. Kanim, and Luanna S. Gomez
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 34-37, doi:10.1063/1.3021266
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The PIs have been involved in an NSF-funded project to develop materials for the introductory mechanics laboratory. The materials are based on the instructional approach taken in Tutorials in Introductory Physics (curriculum developed in the context of the calculus-based course at the University of Washington). While the materials being developed are intended for the algebra-based course, at many universities the labs are common to the two courses. As a result, we have been looking at differences in performance between these two student populations. In this poster, we describe the differences we have observed, especially as related to graphs, proportional reasoning, and algebra. It turns out that you cannot just change the d’s to Deltas—who knew? We will discuss implications for instructors and for curriculum developers.

M. E. Loverude, S. E. Kanim, and L. S. Gomez, Curriculum Design for the Algebra-Based Course: Just Change the ‘D’s to Deltas?, 2008 PERC Proceedings [Edmonton, CA, July 23-24, 2008], edited by C. Henderson, M. Sabella, and L. Hsu [AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, 34-37 (2008)], doi:10.1063/1.3021266.

An Idea for Generating Diversity Conversations: Physics Jeopardy and the Future Faces of Physics Kit
Kendra Rand and Gary White
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 38-41, doi:10.1063/1.3021267
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Is there a way to engage typical physics undergraduates in a conversation about under-represented groups in physics that doesn't result in rolled-eyes or fingers-in-the-ears? The Society of Physics Students (SPS) has begun an experiment using a jeopardy-like game at physics meetings in an attempt to generate conversations about diversity. The physics jeopardy game is part of a "Future Faces of Physics" kit that includes a variety of materials that are of interest to those wanting to address under-represented audiences in physics, such as video clips exhibiting common physics words in sign language, tactile representations of the lunar surface for blind students,guidelines regarding lab procedures for the wheel-chair bound, and the book, Einstein on Race and Racism with a challenge letter directed at SPS chapters from the authors. While attempts to assess the impact of the game are modest, we report anecdotally some of the qualitative features seen in the discussions when the game is played. We also strive to indulge in a few physics jeopardy game moments to give a sense of how the game works. If you are hosting a meeting, large or small, and would like to receive this kit for use at your meeting, notify Kendra Rand, SPS Program Coordinator at krand@aip.org.

K. Rand and G. White, An Idea for Generating Diversity Conversations: Physics Jeopardy and the Future Faces of Physics Kit, 2008 PERC Proceedings [Edmonton, CA, July 23-24, 2008], edited by C. Henderson, M. Sabella, and L. Hsu [AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, 38-41 (2008)], doi:10.1063/1.3021267.

Using the Resources of the Student at the Urban, Comprehensive University to Develop an Effective Instructional Environment
Mel Sabella, Dr. Kim Coble, and Samuel Bowen
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 42-45, doi:10.1063/1.3021269
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Physics Education Researchers have provided instructors with (1) tools to assess student learning, (2) details on the state of student knowledge, and (3) instructional materials and learning environments that have proven to be effective in promoting understanding. Unfortunately, the vast majority of this work has centered on students and instruction at the traditional research university. As instructors begin to implement innovative instructional materials, and as researchers begin to investigate student learning with diverse populations, complex differences emerge. The use of traditional PER tools in non-traditional environments, such as the urban, comprehensive university, often leads to a very narrow picture of student development. Often, this limited view highlights deficiencies in learning and fails to reveal the strengths and resources of this population. In this paper we highlight issues we face with some of the traditional research tools and provide evidence for the resources we have found with our population of students.

M. Sabella, D. K. Coble, and S. Bowen, Using the Resources of the Student at the Urban, Comprehensive University to Develop an Effective Instructional Environment, 2008 PERC Proceedings [Edmonton, CA, July 23-24, 2008], edited by C. Henderson, M. Sabella, and L. Hsu [AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, 42-45 (2008)], doi:10.1063/1.3021269.

Impact of Chemistry Teachers' Knowledge and Practices on Student Achievement
Kathryn Scantlebury
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 46-49, doi:10.1063/1.3021270
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Professional development programs promoting inquiry-based teaching are challenged with providing teachers content knowledge and using pedagogical approaches that model standards based instruction. Inquiry practices are also important for undergraduate students. This paper focuses on the evaluation of an extensive professional development program for chemistry teachers that included chemistry content tests for students and the teachers and the impact of undergraduate research experiences on college students' attitudes towards chemistry. Baseline results for the students showed that there were no gender differences on the achievement test but white students scored significantly higher than non-white students. However, parent/adult involvement with chemistry homework and projects, was a significant negative predictor of 11th grade students' test chemistry achievement score. This paper will focus on students' achievement and attitude results for teachers who are mid-way through the program providing evidence that on-going, sustained professional development in content and pedagogy is critical for improving students' science achievement.

K. Scantlebury, Impact of Chemistry Teachers' Knowledge and Practices on Student Achievement, 2008 PERC Proceedings [Edmonton, CA, July 23-24, 2008], edited by C. Henderson, M. Sabella, and L. Hsu [AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, 46-49 (2008)], doi:10.1063/1.3021270.

Fostering Science Learning In Diverse Urban Settings
Kenneth Tobin
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 50-52, doi:10.1063/1.3021271
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This paper describes how the uses of cogenerative dialogue can afford the creation of learning communities in which difference is respected and regarded as a resource for advancing learning of the collective as well as individuals within the collective. I describe what we learned from a ten-year program of research in which cogenerative dialogues were used in urban high schools to create productive learning environments in which student achievement increased equitably for social categories such as ethnicity, class, and native language. The route toward higher achievement was paved by expanded roles for science teachers and students.

K. Tobin, Fostering Science Learning In Diverse Urban Settings, 2008 PERC Proceedings [Edmonton, CA, July 23-24, 2008], edited by C. Henderson, M. Sabella, and L. Hsu [AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, 50-52 (2008)], doi:10.1063/1.3021271.

Effect of Self Diagnosis on Subsequent Problem Solving Performance
Edit Yerushalmi, Andrew J. Mason, Elisheva Cohen, and Chandralekha Singh
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 53-56, doi:10.1063/1.3021272
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Self-diagnosis tasks aim at fostering diagnostic behavior by explicitly requiring students to present diagnosis as part of the activity of reviewing their problem solutions. The recitation classes in an introductory physics class (~200 students) were split into a control group and three experimental groups in which different levels of guidance was provided for performing the self-diagnosis activities. We have been a) investigating how students in each group performed on subsequent near and far transfer questions given as part of the exams; and b) comparing student's initial scores on their quizzes with their performance on the exams, as well as comparing student's self-diagnosis scores with their performance on the exams. We discuss some hypotheses about the students' ability to self-diagnose with different levels of scaffolding support and emphasize the importance of teaching students how to diagnosis their own mistakes. Our findings suggest that struggling with minimal support during in-class self-diagnosis can trigger out-of-class self-diagnosis. Students therefore may be motivated to make sense of the problem they may have not been able to self diagnose, whether independently or in a collaborative effort.

E. Yerushalmi, A. J. Mason, E. Cohen, and C. Singh, Effect of Self Diagnosis on Subsequent Problem Solving Performance, 2008 PERC Proceedings [Edmonton, CA, July 23-24, 2008], edited by C. Henderson, M. Sabella, and L. Hsu [AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, 53-56 (2008)], doi:10.1063/1.3021272.

PEER REVIEWED MANUSCRIPTS (44)

First Author Index

Adams · Atkins · Baily · Bing · Bonham · Brewe · Brookes · Byun · Chasteen · Cochran · Cohen · Cummings · Demaree · Duda · Gire · Goertzen · Gray · Haynicz · Henderson · Kohl · Kost · Marx · Mason · Mateycik · Mayhew · McBride · Monteyne · Podolefsky · Pollock · Price · Ramlo · Rosenblatt · Rosengrant · Sadaghiani · Sayre · Singh · Teodorescu · Turpen · Undreiu · Warren · Watkins · Wells · Zavala

Peer-reviewed Papers

What Levels of Guidance Promote Engaged Exploration with Interactive Simulations?
Wendy K. Adams, Archie Paulson, and Carl E. Wieman
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 59-62, doi:10.1063/1.3021273
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The Roles of Evidence in Scientific Argument
Leslie J. Atkins
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 63-66, doi:10.1063/1.3021274
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Student Perspectives in Quantum Physics
Charles Baily and Noah D. Finkelstein
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 67-70, doi:10.1063/1.3021275
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Using Warrants As a Window to Epistemic Framing
Thomas J. Bing and Edward F. Redish
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 71-74, doi:10.1063/1.3021276
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Latent Response Times and Cognitive Processing on the FMCE
Scott W. Bonham
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 75-78, doi:10.1063/1.3021277
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CLASS Shifts in Modeling Instruction
Eric Brewe, Laird H. Kramer, and George O'Brien
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 79-82, doi:10.1063/1.3021278
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The Specificity Effect: An Example from Refraction
David T. Brookes, Brian H. Ross, and Jose P. Mestre
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 83-86, doi:10.1063/1.3021280
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Identifying Student Difficulty in Problem Solving Process via the Framework of the House Model (HM)
Taejin Byun, Sangwoo Ha, and Gyoungho Lee
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 87-90, doi:10.1063/1.3021281
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Transforming Upper-Division Electricity and Magnetism
Stephanie Chasteen and Steven J. Pollock
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 91-94, doi:10.1063/1.3021282
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Understanding and Encouraging Effective Collaboration in Introductory Physics Courses
Geraldine L. Cochran and Mel Sabella
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 95-98, doi:10.1063/1.3021283
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Identifying Differences in Diagnostic Skills between Physics Students: Students' Self-Diagnostic Performance Given Alternative Scaffolding
Elisheva Cohen, Andrew J. Mason, Chandralekha Singh, and Edit Yerushalmi
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 99-102, doi:10.1063/1.3021284
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A Study of Peer Instruction Methods with High School Physics Students
Karen Cummings and Stephen G. Roberts
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 103-106, doi:10.1063/1.3021227
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Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Student Textbook Summary Writing
Dedra Demaree, Saalih Allie, Michael Low, and Julian Taylor
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 107-110, doi:10.1063/1.3021228
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Probing Student Online Discussion Behavior with a Course Blog in Introductory Physics
Gintaras Duda and Katherine Garrett
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 111-114, doi:10.1063/1.3021229
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Resources Students Use to Understand Quantum Mechanical Operators
Elizabeth Gire and Corinne A. Manogue
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 115-118, doi:10.1063/1.3021230
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Indicators of Understanding: What TAs Listen for in Student Responses
Renee Michelle Goertzen, Rachel E. Scherr, and Andrew Elby
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 119-122, doi:10.1063/1.3021231
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Analysis of Learning Assistants’ Views of Teaching and Learning
Kara E. Gray and Valerie K. Otero
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 123-126, doi:10.1063/1.3021233
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Students’ Understanding of Inclined Planes Using the CoMPASS Curriculum
Jacquelyn Haynicz, N. Sanjay Rebello, and Sadhana Puntambekar
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 127-130, doi:10.1063/1.3021234
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Facilitating Change in Undergraduate STEM: Initial Results from an Interdisciplinary Literature Review
Charles R. Henderson, Andrea Beach, Noah D. Finkelstein, and R. Sam Larson
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 131-134, doi:10.1063/1.3021235
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Documenting the Conversion from Traditional to Studio Physics Formats at the Colorado School of Mines: Process and Early Results
Patrick B. Kohl , H. Vincent Kuo, and Todd G. Ruskell
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 135-138, doi:10.1063/1.3021236
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The Persistence of the Gender Gap in Introductory Physics
Lauren E. Kost, Steven J. Pollock, and Noah D. Finkelstein
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 139-142, doi:10.1063/1.3021237
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The Effect of Initial Conditions and Discussion on Students’ Predictions for Interactive Lecture Demonstrations
Jeffrey Marx
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 143-146, doi:10.1063/1.3021238
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Identifying Differences in Diagnostic Skills between Physics Students: Developing a Rubric
Andrew J. Mason, Elisheva Cohen, Edit Yerushalmi, and Chandralekha Singh
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 147-150, doi:10.1063/1.3021239
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Use Of Structure Maps To Facilitate Problem Solving In Algebra-Based Physics
Frances Mateycik, David Jonassen, and N. Sanjay Rebello
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 151-154, doi:10.1063/1.3021240
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New Media and Models for Engaging Under-Represented Students in Science
Laurel Mayhew and Noah D. Finkelstein
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 155-158, doi:10.1063/1.3021241
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Examining Student Responses for Meaningful Understanding in the Context of Wavefront Aberrometry
Dyan L. McBride and Dean A. Zollman
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 159-162, doi:10.1063/1.3021242
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An Interdisciplinary Investigation of Student Ability to Connect Particulate and Macroscopic Representations of a Gas
Kereen Monteyne, Barbara L. Gonzalez, and Michael E. Loverude
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 163-166, doi:10.1063/1.3021244
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How Abstract is Abstract? Layering Meaning in Physics
Noah S. Podolefsky and Noah D. Finkelstein
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 167-170, doi:10.1063/1.3021245
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Comparing Student Learning with Multiple Research-Based Conceptual Surveys: CSEM and BEMA
Steven J. Pollock
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 171-174, doi:10.1063/1.3021246
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Archiving Student Solutions with Tablet PCs in a Discussion-based Introductory Physics Class
Edward Price and Charles De Leone
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 175-178, doi:10.1063/1.3021247
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Determining The Various Perspectives And Consensus Within A Classroom Using Q Methodology
Susan Ramlo
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 179-182, doi:10.1063/1.3021248
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Toward a Comprehensive Picture of Student Understanding of Force, Velocity, and Acceleration
Rebecca Rosenblatt, Eleanor C. Sayre, and Andrew F. Heckler
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 183-186, doi:10.1063/1.3021249
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Preliminary Study of Impulse-Momentum Diagrams
David Rosengrant and Taha Mzoughi
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 187-190, doi:10.1063/1.3021250
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Physics By Inquiry: Addressing Student Learning and Attitude
Homeyra R. Sadaghiani
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 191-194, doi:10.1063/1.3021251
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Evolution of Student Knowledge in a Traditional Introductory Classroom
Eleanor C. Sayre and Andrew F. Heckler
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 195-198, doi:10.1063/1.3021252
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Coupling Conceptual and Quantitative Problems to Develop Expertise in Introductory Physics Students
Chandralekha Singh
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 199-202, doi:10.1063/1.3021253
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Enhancing Cognitive Development through Physics Problem Solving: A Taxonomy of Introductory Physics Problems
Raluca E. Teodorescu, Cornelius Bennhold, and Gerald Feldman
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 203-206, doi:10.1063/1.3021255
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Institutionalizing Reform in Introductory Physics
Chandra Turpen and Noah D. Finkelstein
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 207-210, doi:10.1063/1.3021256
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Reasoning Modes, Knowledge Elements and Their Interplay in Optics Problem-Solving
Adriana Undreiu, David Schuster, and Betty Adams
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 211-214, doi:10.1063/1.3021257
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Interactive Problem Solving Tutorials Through Visual Programming
Lucian Undreiu, David Schuster, and Adriana Undreiu
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 215-218, doi:10.1063/1.3021258
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Network Analysis of Social Interactions in Laboratories
Aaron R. Warren
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 219-222, doi:10.1063/1.3021259
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Examining the Effectiveness of Clickers on Promoting Learning by Tracking the Evolution of Student Responses
Erica Watkins and Mel Sabella
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 223-226, doi:10.1063/1.3021260
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Impact of the FIU PhysTEC Reform of Introductory Physics Labs
Leanne Wells, Romona Valenzuela, Eric Brewe, Laird H. Kramer, George O'Brien, and Edgardo Zamalloa
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 227-230, doi:10.1063/1.3021261
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Evaluation of Instruction Using the Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism in Mexico
Genaro Zavala and Hugo Alarcon
AIP Conf. Proc. 1064, pp. 231-234, doi:10.1063/1.3021262
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