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Abstract Title: Identifying Differences in Diagnostic Skills between Physics Students: Developing a Rubric
Abstract: Expert problem solvers are characterized by continuous evaluation of their progress towards a solution. One characteristic of expertise is self-diagnosis directed towards elaboration of the solvers conceptual understanding, knowledge organization or strategic approach. "Self-diagnosis tasks" aim at fostering diagnostic behavior by explicitly requiring students to present diagnosis as part of the activity of reviewing their problem solutions. We have been investigating how introductory physics students perform in such tasks.  
Developing a robust rubric is essential for objective evaluation of students' self-diagnosis skills. We discuss the development of a grading rubric that takes into account introductory physics students' content knowledge as well as analysis, planning and presentation skills. Using this rubric, we have found the inter-rater reliability to be better than 80%. The rubric can easily be adapted to other problems.

Supported by ISF 1283/05 and NSF DUE-0442087
Abstract Type: Contributed Poster
Contributed Poster: Download the Contributed Poster
Contributed Paper Record: Contributed Paper Information
Contributed Paper Download: Download Contributed Paper
Author's Note: The poster and paper refer to novice knowledge (i.e., what correct ideas needed to solve the problem are reflected in student's solution and diagnosis) as well as expert "ideal" knowledge (i.e., what correct ideas needed to solve the problem are reflected in student's solution and diagnosis). The rubric now includes this adaptation, which the paper also explains. This is reflected in the companion paper as well.

Author/Organizer Information

Primary Contact: Andrew Mason
University of Pittsburgh
3941 ohara St
department of Physics, University of PIttsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
Phone: 4126249045
Fax: 4126249163
Co-Author(s)
and Co-Presenter(s)
Elisheva Cohen and Edit Yerushalmi,
Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel;
Chandralekha Singh, University of Pittsburgh