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written by Wolfgang Christian
The simulations presented in this book use the accelerometer on a mobile device to read the direction of the gravitation field g. Users may need to lock the orientation of your screen to maintain a fixed view as you tilt, wiggle, rotate, and shake your device. For use on computers without an accelerometer or for classroom use, the no sensor mode simulates device motion.
Subjects Levels Resource Types
Classical Mechanics
- Applications of Newton's Laws
= Friction
- General
- Motion in One Dimension
= Acceleration
= Gravitational Acceleration
- Motion in Two Dimensions
= 2D Acceleration
- Newton's Second Law
- Lower Undergraduate
- High School
- Informal Education
- Collection
- Instructional Material
= Interactive Simulation
= Textbook
Intended Users Formats Ratings
- Learners
- Educators
- General Publics
- text/html
- application/javascript
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Access Rights:
Free access
License:
This material is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No derivatives 3.0 license.
Rights Holder:
Wolfgang Christian
Keywords:
accelerometer, smartphone accelerometer
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created November 9, 2016 by Wolfgang Christian
Record Updated:
December 15, 2016 by Caroline Hall
Other Collections:

Next Generation Science Standards

Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions (HS-PS2)

Students who demonstrate understanding can: (9-12)
  • Analyze data to support the claim that Newton's second law of motion describes the mathematical relationship among the net force on a macroscopic object, its mass, and its acceleration. (HS-PS2-1)

Disciplinary Core Ideas (K-12)

Forces and Motion (PS2.A)
  • Newton's second law accurately predicts changes in the motion of macroscopic objects. (9-12)
Types of Interactions (PS2.B)
  • Newton's law of universal gravitation and Coulomb's law provide the mathematical models to describe and predict the effects of gravitational and electrostatic forces between distant objects. (9-12)
Information Technologies and Instrumentation (PS4.C)
  • Multiple technologies based on the understanding of waves and their interactions with matter are part of everyday experiences in the modern world (e.g., medical imaging, communications, scanners) and in scientific research. They are essential tools for producing, transmitting, and capturing signals and for storing and interpreting the information contained in them. (9-12)

NGSS Science and Engineering Practices (K-12)

Analyzing and Interpreting Data (K-12)
  • Analyzing data in 9–12 builds on K–8 and progresses to introducing more detailed statistical analysis, the comparison of data sets for consistency, and the use of models to generate and analyze data. (9-12)
    • Analyze data using tools, technologies, and/or models (e.g., computational, mathematical) in order to make valid and reliable scientific claims or determine an optimal design solution. (9-12)
Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions (K-12)
  • Constructing explanations and designing solutions in 9–12 builds on K–8 experiences and progresses to explanations and designs that are supported by multiple and independent student-generated sources of evidence consistent with scientific ideas, principles, and theories. (9-12)
    • Construct and revise an explanation based on valid and reliable evidence obtained from a variety of sources (including students' own investigations, models, theories, simulations, peer review) and the assumption that theories and laws that describe the natural world operate today as they did in the past and will continue to do so in the future. (9-12)
Developing and Using Models (K-12)
  • Modeling in 9–12 builds on K–8 and progresses to using, synthesizing, and developing models to predict and show relationships among variables between systems and their components in the natural and designed worlds. (9-12)
    • Use a model to predict the relationships between systems or between components of a system. (9-12)
    • Use a model to provide mechanistic accounts of phenomena. (9-12)
Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking (5-12)
  • Mathematical and computational thinking at the 9–12 level builds on K–8 and progresses to using algebraic thinking and analysis, a range of linear and nonlinear functions including trigonometric functions, exponentials and logarithms, and computational tools for statistical analysis to analyze, represent, and model data. Simple computational simulations are created and used based on mathematical models of basic assumptions. (9-12)
    • Use mathematical or computational representations of phenomena to describe explanations. (9-12)

NGSS Nature of Science Standards (K-12)

Analyzing and Interpreting Data (K-12)
  • Analyzing data in 9–12 builds on K–8 and progresses to introducing more detailed statistical analysis, the comparison of data sets for consistency, and the use of models to generate and analyze data. (9-12)
Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions (K-12)
  • Constructing explanations and designing solutions in 9–12 builds on K–8 experiences and progresses to explanations and designs that are supported by multiple and independent student-generated sources of evidence consistent with scientific ideas, principles, and theories. (9-12)
Developing and Using Models (K-12)
  • Modeling in 9–12 builds on K–8 and progresses to using, synthesizing, and developing models to predict and show relationships among variables between systems and their components in the natural and designed worlds. (9-12)
Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking (5-12)
  • Mathematical and computational thinking at the 9–12 level builds on K–8 and progresses to using algebraic thinking and analysis, a range of linear and nonlinear functions including trigonometric functions, exponentials and logarithms, and computational tools for statistical analysis to analyze, represent, and model data. Simple computational simulations are created and used based on mathematical models of basic assumptions. (9-12)
ComPADRE is beta testing Citation Styles!

Record Link
AIP Format
W. Christian, (2016), WWW Document, (http://www.compadre.org/books/MobileModels).
AJP/PRST-PER
W. Christian, Mobile Device Models, (2016), <http://www.compadre.org/books/MobileModels>.
APA Format
Christian, W. (2016). Mobile Device Models. Retrieved February 25, 2017, from http://www.compadre.org/books/MobileModels
Chicago Format
Christian, Wolfgang. Mobile Device Models. 2016. http://www.compadre.org/books/MobileModels (accessed 25 February 2017).
MLA Format
Christian, Wolfgang. Mobile Device Models. 2016. 25 Feb. 2017 <http://www.compadre.org/books/MobileModels>.
BibTeX Export Format
@book{ Author = "Wolfgang Christian", Title = {Mobile Device Models}, Year = {2016} }
Refer Export Format

%A Wolfgang Christian
%T Mobile Device Models
%D 2016
%U http://www.compadre.org/books/MobileModels
%O text/html

EndNote Export Format

%0 Book
%A Christian, Wolfgang
%D 2016
%T Mobile Device Models
%U http://www.compadre.org/books/MobileModels


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Citation Source Information

The AIP Style presented is based on information from the AIP Style Manual.

The APA Style presented is based on information from APA Style.org: Electronic References.

The Chicago Style presented is based on information from Examples of Chicago-Style Documentation.

The MLA Style presented is based on information from the MLA FAQ.

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