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American Journal of Physics
written by Frederick Reif
Physics is an intellectually demanding discipline and many students have difficulties learning to deal with it.  Further, our instruction is often far less effective than we realize. Indeed, recent investigations have revealed that many students, even when getting good grades, emerge from their basic physics courses with signification scientific misconcepts, with prescientific notions, with poor problem-solving skills, and with an inability to apply what they ostensibly learned. In short, students' acquired physics knowledge is often largely nominal rather than functiional.

This situation leads one to ask: Why is this so, and what can be done about it? More specifically, it has led me to address the following two basic questions: (a) Can one understand better the underlying throught processes required to deal with a science like physics? (b) How can such an understanding be used to design more effective instruction?

These are the questions which have been the focus of my work during the last several years and which I want to discuss in this article.
American Journal of Physics: Volume 63, Issue 1, Pages 17-32
Subjects ADS Supplements Resource Types
Education - Applied Research
- Instructional Material Design
- Pedagogy
= Instructional Issues
Education - Basic Research
- Learning Theory
- Research Design & Methodology
- Student Characteristics
- Reference Material
= Article
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© 1995 American Association of Physics Teachers
DOI:
10.1119/1.17764
PACSs:
01.40.G-
01.55.+b
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created February 16, 2010 by Lyle Barbato
Record Updated:
July 28, 2011 by Lyle Barbato
Last Update
when Cataloged:
January 1, 1995
ComPADRE is beta testing Citation Styles!

Record Link
AIP Format
F. Reif, Am. J. Phys. 63 (1), 17 (1995), WWW Document, (http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.17764).
AJP/PRST-PER
F. Reif, Millikan Lecture 1994: Understanding and teaching important scientific thought processes Am. J. Phys. 63 (1), 17 (1995), <http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.17764>.
APA Format
Reif, F. (1995, January 1). Millikan Lecture 1994: Understanding and teaching important scientific thought processes. Am. J. Phys., 63(1), 17-32. Retrieved April 23, 2014, from http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.17764
Chicago Format
Reif, Frederick. "Millikan Lecture 1994: Understanding and teaching important scientific thought processes." Am. J. Phys. 63, no. 1, (January 1, 1995): 17-32, http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.17764 (accessed 23 April 2014).
MLA Format
Reif, Frederick. "Millikan Lecture 1994: Understanding and teaching important scientific thought processes." Am. J. Phys. 63.1 (1995): 17-32. 23 Apr. 2014 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.17764>.
BibTeX Export Format
@article{ Author = "Frederick Reif", Title = {Millikan Lecture 1994: Understanding and teaching important scientific thought processes}, Journal = {Am. J. Phys.}, Volume = {63}, Number = {1}, Pages = {17-32}, Month = {January}, Year = {1995} }
Refer Export Format

%A Frederick Reif
%T Millikan Lecture 1994: Understanding and teaching important scientific thought processes
%J Am. J. Phys.
%V 63
%N 1
%D January 1, 1995
%P 17-32
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.17764
%O application/pdf

EndNote Export Format

%0 Journal Article
%A Reif, Frederick
%D January 1, 1995
%T Millikan Lecture 1994: Understanding and teaching important scientific thought processes
%J Am. J. Phys.
%V 63
%N 1
%P 17-32
%8 January 1, 1995
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.17764


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