home - login - register

Thesis Detail Page

written by Aaron Titus
sub author: Robert J. Beichner
Problem solving is of paramount importance in teaching and learning physics.  An important step in solving a problem is visualization.  To help students visualize a problem, we included video clips with homework questions delivered via the World Wide Web.  Although including video with physics problems has a positive effect with some problems, we found that this may not be the best way to integrate multimedia with physics problems since improving visualization is probably not as helpful as changing students' approach. To challenge how students solve problems and to help them develop a more expert-like approach, we developed a type of physics exercise called a multimedia focused problem where students take data from an animation in order to solve a problem. Because numbers suggestive of a solution are not given in the text of the question, students have to consider the problem conceptually before analyzing it mathematically. As a result, we found that students had difficulty solving such problems compared to traditional textbook-like problems. Students' survey responses showed that students indeed had difficulty determining what was needed to solve a problem when it was not explicitly given to them in the text of the question. Analyzing think-aloud interviews where students verbalized their thoughts while solving problems, we found that multimedia-focused problems indeed required solid conceptual understanding in order for them to be solved correctly.
University: North Carolina State University
Academic Department:  Physics
Pages 316
Subjects Levels Resource Types
Education - Applied Research
- Active Learning
= Problem Solving
- Technology
= Multimedia
Education - Basic Research
- Research Design & Methodology
General Physics
- Physics Education Research
- Lower Undergraduate
- High School
- Informal Education
- Instructional Material
= Instructor Guide/Manual
- Reference Material
= Research study
PER-Central Types Intended Users Ratings
- PER Literature
- Thesis/Dissertation
- Researchers
- Educators
  • Currently 0.0/5

Want to rate this material?
Login here!


Format:
application/pdf
Access Rights:
Free access
Restriction:
© 1998 Aaron Titus
Keywords:
World Wide Web, problem solving, visualization
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created July 14, 2005 by Lyle Barbato
Record Updated:
October 17, 2005 by Vince Kuo
Last Update
when Cataloged:
January 1, 1998
ComPADRE is beta testing Citation Styles!

Record Link
AIP Format
A. Titus, North Carolina State University, 1998, WWW Document, (http://www.ncsu.edu/per/Articles/TitusDissertation.pdf).
AJP/PRST-PER
A. Titus, Integrating video and animation with physics problem solving exercises on the World Wide Web, North Carolina State University, 1998, <http://www.ncsu.edu/per/Articles/TitusDissertation.pdf>.
APA Format
Titus, A. (1998, January 1). Integrating video and animation with physics problem solving exercises on the World Wide Web (North Carolina State University, 1998). Retrieved November 28, 2014, from http://www.ncsu.edu/per/Articles/TitusDissertation.pdf
Chicago Format
Titus, Aaron. "Integrating video and animation with physics problem solving exercises on the World Wide Web." North Carolina State University, 1998. http://www.ncsu.edu/per/Articles/TitusDissertation.pdf (accessed 28 November 2014).
MLA Format
Titus, Aaron. "Integrating video and animation with physics problem solving exercises on the World Wide Web." 1 Jan. 1998. North Carolina State University, 1998. 28 Nov. 2014 <http://www.ncsu.edu/per/Articles/TitusDissertation.pdf>.
BibTeX Export Format
@phdthesis{ Author = "Aaron Titus", Title = {Integrating video and animation with physics problem solving exercises on the World Wide Web}, School = {North Carolina State University}, Month = {January}, Year = {1998} }
Refer Export Format

%A Aaron Titus
%T Integrating video and animation with physics problem solving exercises on the World Wide Web
%D January 1, 1998
%P 316
%I North Carolina State University
%U http://www.ncsu.edu/per/Articles/TitusDissertation.pdf
%O Physics
%O application/pdf

EndNote Export Format

%0 Thesis
%A Titus, Aaron
%D January 1, 1998
%T Integrating video and animation with physics problem solving exercises on the World Wide Web
%B Physics
%I North Carolina State University
%P 316
%8 January 1, 1998
%U http://www.ncsu.edu/per/Articles/TitusDissertation.pdf


Disclaimer: ComPADRE offers citation styles as a guide only. We cannot offer interpretations about citations as this is an automated procedure. Please refer to the style manuals in the Citation Source Information area for clarifications.

Citation Source Information

The AIP Style presented is based on information from the AIP Style Manual.

The AJP/PRST-PER presented is based on the AIP Style with the addition of journal article titles and conference proceeding article titles.

The APA Style presented is based on information from APA Style.org: Electronic References.

The Chicago Style presented is based on information from Examples of Chicago-Style Documentation.

The MLA Style presented is based on information from the MLA FAQ.

Save to my folders

Contribute

Similar Materials