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International Journal of Science Education
written by James Monaghan and John J. Clement
Think aloud interview protocols from three high school post-physics students who interacted with a relative motion computer simulation presented in a predict-observe-explain format are analysed. Evidence is presented for: qualitative and quantitative difficulties with apparently simple one-dimensional relative motion problems; students' spontaneous visualization of relative motion problems; the visualizations facilitating solution of these problems; and students' memory of the on-line simulation used as a framework for visualization of post-test problems solved off-line. Instances of successful and unsuccessful mapping of remembered simulation features onto target problems are presented. Evidence from hand motions and other indicators suggesting that the subjects were using dynamic imagery in mental simulations during the treatment and post-test is presented. On the basis of these observations, it is hypothesized that for successful students, dissonance between their incorrect predictions and simulations displayed by the computer initiated the construction of new ways of thinking about relative motion, and that the memory of certain simulations acted as an analogue 'framework for visualization' of target problems solved off-line after the intervention. In such cases we find that interaction with a computer simulation on-line can facilitate a student's appropriate mental simulations off-line in related target problems. Implications for design and use of educational computer simulations are discussed.
International Journal of Science Education: Volume 21, Issue 9, Pages 921-944
Subjects Levels Resource Types
Education - Applied Research
- Technology
= Computers
Education - Basic Research
- Cognition
General Physics
- Physics Education Research
- High School
- Lower Undergraduate
- Reference Material
= Research study
PER-Central Type Intended Users Ratings
- PER Literature
- Researchers
- Educators
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Access Rights:
Available by subscription
Restriction:
© 1999 Taylor & Francis Group
Additional information is available.
DOI:
10.1080/095006999290237
Keywords:
Cognitive Processes, Computer Simulation, Concept Formation, Memory, Motion, Physics, Problem Solving, Relativity, Science Education, Scientific Concepts, Secondary Education, Thinking Skills, Visualization
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created July 13, 2005 by Lyle Barbato
Record Updated:
November 23, 2005 by Vince Kuo
Last Update
when Cataloged:
September 15, 1999
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Record Link
AIP Format
J. Monaghan and J. Clement, Int. J. Sci. Educ. 21 (9), 921 (1999), WWW Document, (http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/095006999290237).
AJP/PRST-PER
J. Monaghan and J. Clement, Use of a computer simulation to develop mental simulations for understanding relative motion concepts Int. J. Sci. Educ. 21 (9), 921 (1999), <http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/095006999290237>.
APA Format
Monaghan, J., & Clement, J. (1999, September 15). Use of a computer simulation to develop mental simulations for understanding relative motion concepts. Int. J. Sci. Educ., 21(9), 921-944. Retrieved September 2, 2014, from http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/095006999290237
Chicago Format
Monaghan, James, and John Clement. "Use of a computer simulation to develop mental simulations for understanding relative motion concepts." Int. J. Sci. Educ. 21, no. 9, (September 15, 1999): 921-944, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/095006999290237 (accessed 2 September 2014).
MLA Format
Monaghan, James, and John Clement. "Use of a computer simulation to develop mental simulations for understanding relative motion concepts." Int. J. Sci. Educ. 21.9 (1999): 921-944. 2 Sep. 2014 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/095006999290237>.
BibTeX Export Format
@article{ Author = "James Monaghan and John Clement", Title = {Use of a computer simulation to develop mental simulations for understanding relative motion concepts}, Journal = {Int. J. Sci. Educ.}, Volume = {21}, Number = {9}, Pages = {921-944}, Month = {September}, Year = {1999} }
Refer Export Format

%A James Monaghan
%A John Clement
%T Use of a computer simulation to develop mental simulations for understanding relative motion concepts
%J Int. J. Sci. Educ.
%V 21
%N 9
%D September 15, 1999
%P 921-944
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/095006999290237
%O text/html

EndNote Export Format

%0 Journal Article
%A Monaghan, James
%A Clement, John
%D September 15, 1999
%T Use of a computer simulation to develop mental simulations for understanding relative motion concepts
%J Int. J. Sci. Educ.
%V 21
%N 9
%P 921-944
%8 September 15, 1999
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/095006999290237


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