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The Physics Teacher
written by Richard Hake
Socratic dialogue-inducing (SDI) labs are based on Arnold Arons' half-century of ethnographic research, listening carefully to students' responses to probing Socratic questions on physics, science, and ways of thinking, and culminating in his landmark Teaching Introductory Physics. They utilize "interactive engagement" methods and are designed, in part, to help students think like scientists, e.g., to: (1) appreciate the need for operational definitions; (2) use and interpret pictorial, graphical, vectorial, mathematical, and written representations; and (3) consider dimensions, thought experiments, and limiting conditions. After giving some SDI lab examples from those categories, I conclude that the SDI lab attempts to help students think like scientists have been relatively successful.
The Physics Teacher: Volume 50, Issue 1, Pages 48-52
Subjects ADS Supplements Resource Types
Education - Applied Research
- Active Learning
- Curriculum Development
= Laboratory
General Physics
- Collections
= Introductory Mechanics
- Scientific Reasoning
- Reference Material
= Article
PER-Central Types Intended Users Ratings
- PER Literature
- Curriculum
- Curriculum / Pedagogy Guide
- Educators
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© 2012 American Association of Physics Teachers
DOI:
10.1119/1.3670087
NSF Number:
9253965
PACSs:
01.50.Kw
01.50.My
Keywords:
Methods for high school teachers, Methods for preservice teachers, SDI, Socratic dialog, teaching methods
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created March 28, 2012 by Sam McKagan
Record Updated:
February 26, 2013 by Lyle Barbato
Last Update
when Cataloged:
January 1, 2012
Other Collections:

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Record Link
AIP Format
R. Hake, Phys. Teach. 50 (1), 48 (2012), WWW Document, (http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.3670087).
AJP/PRST-PER
R. Hake, Helping Students to Think Like Scientists in Socratic Dialogue-Inducing Labs Phys. Teach. 50 (1), 48 (2012), <http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.3670087>.
APA Format
Hake, R. (2012, January 1). Helping Students to Think Like Scientists in Socratic Dialogue-Inducing Labs. Phys. Teach., 50(1), 48-52. Retrieved April 24, 2014, from http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.3670087
Chicago Format
Hake, Richard. "Helping Students to Think Like Scientists in Socratic Dialogue-Inducing Labs." Phys. Teach. 50, no. 1, (January 1, 2012): 48-52, http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.3670087 (accessed 24 April 2014).
MLA Format
Hake, Richard. "Helping Students to Think Like Scientists in Socratic Dialogue-Inducing Labs." Phys. Teach. 50.1 (2012): 48-52. 24 Apr. 2014 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.3670087>.
BibTeX Export Format
@article{ Author = "Richard Hake", Title = {Helping Students to Think Like Scientists in Socratic Dialogue-Inducing Labs}, Journal = {Phys. Teach.}, Volume = {50}, Number = {1}, Pages = {48-52}, Month = {January}, Year = {2012} }
Refer Export Format

%A Richard Hake
%T Helping Students to Think Like Scientists in Socratic Dialogue-Inducing Labs
%J Phys. Teach.
%V 50
%N 1
%D January 1, 2012
%P 48-52
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.3670087
%O application/pdf

EndNote Export Format

%0 Journal Article
%A Hake, Richard
%D January 1, 2012
%T Helping Students to Think Like Scientists in Socratic Dialogue-Inducing Labs
%J Phys. Teach.
%V 50
%N 1
%P 48-52
%8 January 1, 2012
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.3670087


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The AIP Style presented is based on information from the AIP Style Manual.

The AJP/PRST-PER presented is based on the AIP Style with the addition of journal article titles and conference proceeding article titles.

The APA Style presented is based on information from APA Style.org: Electronic References.

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