home - login - register

The Impact of Course Structure on eText Use in Large-Lecture Introductory-Physics Courses Documents

Main Document

The Impact of Course Structure on eText Use in Large-Lecture Introductory-Physics Courses 

written by Daniel T. Seaton, Yoav Bergner, Gerd Kortemeyer, Saif Rayyan, Isaac Chuang, and David E. Pritchard

Course structure - the types and frequency of learning activities - impacts how students interact with electronic textbooks. We analyze student-tracking logs generated by the LON-CAPA learning management system from nearly a decade of blended large-lecture introductory-physics courses at Michigan State University, as well as one on-campus course from MIT. Data mining provides estimates of the overall amount and temporal regularity of eText use, i.e., weekly reading versus review immediately before exams. For all courses studied, we compare student use of eTexts as it varies with course structure, e.g., from traditional (three or four exams, eText assigned as supplementary) to reformed (frequent exams, embedded assessment in the assigned eText). Traditional format courses are accompanied by little eText use, while high reading levels persist throughout reformed courses.

Published February 1, 2014
Last Modified January 31, 2014

This file is included in the full-text index.